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  • Associations of Weight Gain From Early to Middle Adulthood With Major Health Outcomes Later in Life

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    JAMA. 2017; 318(3):255-269. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.7092

    This cohort analysis uses Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study data to examine the association between weight gain in early to middle adulthood and heart disease, cancer, and death later in life.

  • Screening for Obesity and Intervention for Weight Management in Children and Adolescents: Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force

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    JAMA. 2017; 317(23):2427-2444. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.0332

    This Evidence Report and systematic review to support the 2017 US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement on screening for obesity summarizes current evidence on the benefits and harms of screening and treatment for obesity and overweight in children and adolescents.

  • JAMA June 20, 2017

    Figure 4: Change in Weight (BMI z Score, BMI, Weight in Kilograms, or BMI Percentile) in Behavior-Based Weight Loss Intervention Trials, by Estimated Hours of Contact, Showing DerSimonian and Laird Pooled Estimates (Key Question 4)

    BMI indicates body mass index.aStudy-reported repeated-measures or adjusted analysis demonstrated a statistically significant benefit.bIntervention had not yet ended at 12-month assessment.
  • Losing Weight During the Postpartum Period

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(23):2375-2376. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.7036
  • Effect of an Internet-Based Program on Weight Loss for Low-Income Postpartum Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(23):2381-2391. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.7119

    This cluster randomized clinical trial assessed the effects of adding an internet-based weight loss intervention program to the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC program) on weight loss over 12 months among low-income, postpartum women.

  • JAMA June 6, 2017

    Figure 3: Obese Subgroup Analysis With Summary of Pooled Odds Ratios (ORs) for the Association Between Gestational Weight Loss, Gain Below Guidelines, and Gain Above Guidelines With Adverse Outcomes

    Pooled ORs are shown for the association between gestational weight loss (A), gestational weight gain below guidelines (B), and gestational weight gain above guidelines (C) with adverse outcomes. Obesity classes indicate body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) as follows: class 1, BMI of 30 to 34.9; class 2, BMI of 35 to 39.9; and class 3, BMI of 40 or higher. Reference group is women with recommended weight gain in each category of BMI. For each outcome, the sample size represents the total number of women in the studies that assessed the outcome. For each obesity category, the sample size represents the total number of women with weight loss, gestational weight gain below the guidelines, or gestational weight gain above the guidelines.
  • JAMA April 25, 2017

    Figure 2: Time to Colonoscopy After a Positive FIT and Adjusted Riska of Advanced Adenoma, Any Colorectal Cancer, and Advanced-Stage Colorectal Cancer

    BMI indicates body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared); FIT, fecal immunochemical test; OR, odds ratio. Models for any colorectal cancer include the entire population. Advanced adenoma was defined as adenomas with advanced histology (ie, tubulovillous and villous adenomas). Models for advanced adenoma exclude 2191 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Advanced-stage cancers were defined as stage III (regional lymph node involvement) or stage IV (distant metastasis) according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system or, for those without such staging, as code 3 (disease in the regional lymph nodes), code 4 (regional disease with direct extension and spread to the regional lymph nodes), or code 7 (distant metastasis) according to the 2013 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Coding and Staging Manual. Models for advanced-stage colorectal cancer exclude 14 patients with colorectal cancer of unknown stage. The adjusted advanced-stage colorectal cancer model dropped 244 patients with unknown BMI because no patient with unknown BMI had this outcome. aAdjusted for sex; age; race/ethnicity; BMI; region; FIT screening year; completion of previous FIT screening (ever and in the prior year); and in the year prior to FIT screening, receipt of the flu or pneumonia vaccine, presence of gastrointestinal symptoms (bleeding or blood in stool, unexplained weight loss, abdominal pain, diarrhea, diverticulitis, inflammatory bowel disease, or Lynch syndrome), diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia or diabetes, current smoker, number of primary care visits, and number of days hospitalized.bRates (95% CIs) were per 1000 patients who had a colonoscopy after a positive FIT.
  • JAMA April 25, 2017

    Figure 3: Time to Colonoscopy After a Positive FIT and Adjusted Riska of Colorectal Cancer Stages 0-IV

    BMI indicates body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared); FIT, fecal immunochemical test; OR, odds ratio. Models for stage-specific colorectal cancer exclude patients with colorectal cancer of any stage other than the specified stage. The adjusted models for colorectal cancer stages 0, III, and IV dropped 242 patients with unknown BMI because no patient with unknown BMI had these outcomes. The adjusted colorectal cancer stage IV model dropped 2435 patients with unknown race/ethnicity because no patient with unknown race/ethnicity had this outcome.aAdjusted for sex; age; race/ethnicity; BMI; region; FIT screening year; completion of previous FIT screening (ever and in the prior year); and in the year prior to FIT screening, receipt of the flu or pneumonia vaccine, presence of gastrointestinal symptoms (bleeding or blood in stool, unexplained weight loss, abdominal pain, diarrhea, diverticulitis, inflammatory bowel disease, or Lynch syndrome), diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia or diabetes, current smoker, number of primary care visits, and number of days hospitalized.bRates (95% CIs) were per 1000 patients who had a colonoscopy after a positive FIT.
  • Unveiling the “Magic” of Diabetes Remission After Weight-Loss Surgery

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(6):571-574. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.0020

    This Medical News article discusses theories explaining type 2 diabetes remission in patients who have undergone bariatric surgery.

  • JAMA December 27, 2016

    Figure: Physicians Can Motivate Patients to Shed Pounds

    Patients welcome quick weight-loss counseling.
  • Physicians Can Motivate Patients to Shed Pounds

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(24):2589-2589. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.18408
  • Effect of Wearable Technology Combined With a Lifestyle Intervention on Long-term Weight Loss: The IDEA Randomized Clinical Trial

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    JAMA. 2016; 316(11):1161-1171. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.12858

    This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of a technology-enhanced vs a standard behavioral weight loss intervention on achieving weight loss over 24 months among adults.

  • JAMA September 20, 2016

    Figure: Flow of Participants Through the IDEA Study

    BMI indicates body mass index; EWLI, technology-enhanced weight loss intervention; IDEA, Innovative Approaches to Diet, Exercise, and Activity; SBWI, standard behavioral weight loss intervention.aCalculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared.
  • Weight Loss And Birth Rate in Obese Women

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(4):385-385. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.9510
  • Partnering Behavioral Modification With Bariatric Surgery

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(4):448-449. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.9033

    This commentary discusses an observational cohort study published in JAMA Surgery that investigated postoperative eating behaviors and weight control and their effects on 3-year change in weight.

  • JAMA June 14, 2016

    Figure 3: Comparison of Weight Loss and Adverse Events With Pharmacological Weight Loss Agents in Network Meta-analysis

    Summary estimate represents odds ratio of achieving at least 5% weight loss (light gray background) and discontinuation due to adverse events (light blue background). Agents are ordered by rankings for the 5% weight loss outcome. Odds ratio for comparisons are in the cell in common between the column-defining and row-defining treatment. For weight loss outcome, row treatment is compared with column treatment (ie, column treatment is reference). For adverse event outcome, column treatment is compared with row treatment (ie, row treatment is reference). Numbers in parentheses indicate 95% credible intervals (95% CrIs). Numbers in bold represent statistically significant results.
  • JAMA June 14, 2016

    Figure 2: Network of Included Studies With Available Direct Comparisons for Primary Efficacy Outcome (≥5% Weight Loss)

    The size of the nodes and the thickness of the edges are weighted according to the number of studies evaluating each treatment and direct comparison, respectively. The study by Swinburn et al reported only continuous weight loss outcomes and is not included in this network. Network of included studies for all other outcomes is shown in eFigure 1 in the Supplement.
  • JAMA June 14, 2016

    Figure 4: SUCRAs for Weight Loss and Adverse Event Outcomes

    Surface under the cumulative rankings (SUCRAs) between 0 and 1 represent the probability of being ranked highest. For the weight loss outcomes, higher score corresponds to higher proportion achieving at least 5% weight loss with a particular therapy. For the adverse event outcome, higher scores reflect lower probability of discontinuation due to adverse events. The median ranks on both weight loss and adverse event rates (rank 1 through 6 on each scale) are tabulated along with their corresponding 95% credible intervals (95% CrIs).
  • Liraglutide (Saxenda) for Weight Loss

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 315(11):1161-1162. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.2083

    This Medical Letter review summarizes information about liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist approved for long-term weight weight management in adults with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater, or in those with a BMI of 27 or greater plus weight-related comorbidity such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, or diabetes.

  • Mental Health Conditions Among Patients Seeking and Undergoing Bariatric Surgery: A Meta-analysis

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2016; 315(2):150-163. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.18118

    This meta-analysis summarizes published evidence about the prevalence of mental health conditions in patients undergoing bariatric surgery and associations between those conditions and weight loss outcomes.