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  • Trachoma Intervention

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2012; 307(7):656-656. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.135
  • Effect of Mass Distribution of Azithromycin for Trachoma Control on Overall Mortality in Ethiopian Children: A Randomized Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2009; 302(9):962-968. doi: 10.1001/jama.2009.1266
  • Trachoma

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2009; 302(9):1022-1022. doi: 10.1001/jama.302.9.1022
  • JAMA September 2, 2009

    Figure: Participant Flow

    Entire communities were randomized to 1 of the 4 study groups (annual, biannual, quarterly [children only], and delayed [untreated for the 1-year duration of this study; at 1 year mass administration of azithromycin for trachoma elimination was undertaken]). A total of 66 404 individuals were enumerated in these communities including 18 415 children aged 1-9 years. These groups form part of an evaluation trial for trachoma elimination in which trachoma-related results are to be reported elsewhere. aPrimary analysis was based on baseline census population.bSpecifies that subkebeles did not receive an intensive sponsored effort to construct large numbers of latrines. Cannot denote “without latrine construction” because some individuals constructed latrines on their own.cNumber of participants who received assigned intervention differs from number enrolled because of exclusions for allergy or pregnancy.dNumber of patients who received interval interventions following baseline differ slightly because of relocation or unavailability due to work.
  • Comparison of Annual and Biannual Mass Antibiotic Administration for Elimination of Infectious Trachoma

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2008; 299(7):778-784. doi: 10.1001/jama.299.7.778
  • Mass Antibiotic Administration for Eradication of Ocular Chlamydia trachomatis

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2008; 299(7):819-821. doi: 10.1001/jama.299.7.819
  • JAMA September 27, 2006

    Figure 1: Two-Component Targeted-Household Treatment Model for Active Trachoma Screening and Antibiotic Treatment

    Active trachoma refers to individuals with follicular inflammation, intense inflammation, or both, as defined in the “Clinical Diagnosis” section of the “Methods”. Component 1 included SAFE (Surgery for trachomatous trichiasis; Antibiotics for Chlamydia trachomatis; Facial cleanliness; and Environmental improvement) and SA communes to identify index cases aged 5 through 15 years. Component 2 was designed to identify household members of index cases in the SAFE and SA communes and to identify active trachoma cases in the SAFE, SA, and S-only communes. Targeted azithromycin treatment was not administered in the S-only commune. Individuals missing a clinical diagnosis of trachoma or age data were excluded from this model.
  • JAMA September 27, 2006

    Figure 2: Rates of Active Trachoma and Chlamydia trachomatis Infection by Commune

    Azithromycin treatment was administered just after trachoma grading and collection of the conjunctival sample for commercial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Numbers in the chart below the plots represent numerator and denominator values for the respective commune at each time point. SAFE, SA, and S-only are derived from the abbreviation for Surgery for trachomatous trichiasis; Antibiotics for Chlamydia trachomatis; Facial cleanliness; and Environmental improvement.
  • Impact of Annual Targeted Treatment on Infectious Trachoma and Susceptibility to Reinfection

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2006; 296(12):1488-1497. doi: 10.1001/jama.296.12.1488
  • JAMA September 27, 2006

    Figure 3: Total Infection Prevalence and New Infection, Continuing Infection, and Reinfection Rates

    Total infection prevalence (baseline) and new infection, continuing infection, and reinfection rates for each commune over 3 years. At each time point, data are shown as percentage of the population in each commune. Targeted-household azithromycin treatment was administered just after trachoma grading and collection of the conjunctival sample for commercial polymerase chain reaction detection of Chlamydia trachomatis infection. SAFE, SA, and S-only are derived from the abbreviation for Surgery for trachomatous trichiasis; Antibiotics for Chlamydia trachomatis; Facial cleanliness; and Environmental improvement.
  • Effect of a Single Mass Antibiotic Distribution on the Prevalence of Infectious Trachoma

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2006; 295(10):1142-1146. doi: 10.1001/jama.295.10.1142
  • JAMA August 11, 2004

    Figure 2: Mathematical Projections of Trachoma Prevalence Derived From Empirical Pretreatment, 2-Month, and 6-Month Posttreatment Results

    Projections are based on the assumptions that treatment is administered once, annually, or biannually; coverage is 80%; and antibiotic efficacy in an individual is 95%. Projections follow logistic growth determined by the equation: baseline prevalence/(1 + C e−[rate of return][time]), where C is a constant that is fit by the empirical data.
  • Miscellanea Medica

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2002; 287(6):705-705. doi: 10.1001/jama.287.6.705-JMN0213-4-2
  • Safe From Trachoma

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 1999; 281(2):123-123. doi: 10.1001/jama.281.2.123-JWM80010-3-1
  • JAMA Patient Page: The doctor will see you now

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 1998; 280(9):860-860. doi: 10.1001/jama.280.9.860
  • JAMA September 2, 2009

    Figure: Trachoma

  • Childhood Trachoma in a Nonendemic Area: Danish Trachoma Patients and Their Close Contacts, 1963 to 1973

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 1978; 239(17):1765-1771. doi: 10.1001/jama.1978.03280440049015
  • Targeted Treatment of Active Trachoma

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2007; 297(6):588-590. doi: 10.1001/jama.285.6.734
  • Targeted Treatment of Active Trachoma

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2007; 297(6):588-590. doi: 10.1001/jama.297.6.588-b
  • Targeted Treatment of Active Trachoma—Reply

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2007; 297(6):588-590. doi: 10.1001/jama.297.6.589