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  • JAMA November 1, 2016

    Figure 5: Clinical Response of Wound Healing as Assessed by 2 Independent Investigators

    Percentage of healing based on clinical and photographic assessment of eroded vs noneroded skin areas by investigators at the time points in the Figure. Time point assessments varied by 3 weeks. Only a small portion (3- to 4-mm biopsy) of the grafts was sampled serially at study visits to preserve the grafts.
  • JAMA November 1, 2016

    Figure 1: Clinical and Microscopic Analysis of Autologous Collagen VII Gene–Corrected Grafts in Patients 1 and 2

    Clinical representation of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) phenotype (top row in each panel), indirect immunofluorescence microscopy (middle row in each panel), and immunoelectron microscopy (bottom row in each panel) analysis of type VII collagen expression in skin grafts. Dotted lines in patient 2 represent the margins of the original grafts. Clinical images were obtained with Canfield Vectra 3D camera and then stitched together to create a comprehensive 3D image. Using Mirror Software (Canfield), landmarks were selected and numbered to identify corresponding locations on each image, and then melded into a single image. In the top rows, the graft boundaries are indicated with purple dashed lines. The presence of RDEB is apparent by the characteristic spontaneous blisters prior to corrected skin transplantation compared with corrected skin 3, 6, and 12 months after grafting. For the middle rows, the nuclear staining dye used was Hoechst 33342 (blue), the scale bar is 100 μm, and the green staining shows the type VII collagen at the dermal-epidermal basement membrane of the corrected tissue grafts. For immunoelectron microscopy analyses of corrected RDEB skin grafts (bottom rows), tissue sections were labeled en bloc with anti–type VII collagen noncollagenous domain 2 monoclonal antibody LH24 antibody, followed by antimouse IgM-conjugated immunogold particles (black dots), which decorate anchoring fibrils (indicated by arrowheads).
  • JAMA November 1, 2016

    Figure 2: Clinical and Microscopic Analysis of Autologous Collagen VII Gene–Corrected Grafts in Patients 3 and 4 and Untreated Wounds From Patient 4

    Clinical representation of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) phenotype (top row in panels A and B), indirect immunofluorescence microscopy (middle row in panels A and B), and immunoelectron microscopy (bottom row in panels A and B) analysis of type VII collagen expression in skin grafts. In the top rows of panels A and B, the dotted lines represent the margins of the original grafts. Clinical images were obtained with Canfield Vectra 3D camera and then stitched together to create a comprehensive 3D image. Using Mirror Software (Canfield), landmarks were selected and numbered to identify corresponding locations on each image, and then melded into a single image. In the top rows in panels A and B, the graft boundaries are indicated with purple dashed lines. In panels A and B, the presence of RDEB is apparent by the characteristic spontaneous blisters prior to corrected skin transplantation and in untreated wounds (panel C) compared with corrected skin 3, 6, and 12 months after grafting. For the middle rows in panels A and B, the nuclear staining dye used was Hoechst 33342 (blue), the scale bar is 100 μm, and the green staining shows the type VII collagen at the dermal-epidermal basement membrane of the corrected tissue grafts. For immunoelectron microscopy analyses of corrected RDEB skin grafts (bottom rows in panels A and B), tissue sections were labeled en bloc with anti–type VII collagen noncollagenous domain 2 monoclonal antibody LH24 antibody, followed by antimouse IgM-conjugated immunogold particles (black dots), which decorate anchoring fibrils (indicated by arrowheads).
  • JAMA November 1, 2016

    Figure 4: Virus Transduction Efficiency and Mean Proviral Copy Number per Cell in Corrected Keratinocytes in 4 Patients With Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    A, Individual data markers represent the amount of type VII collagen–positive cells for each patient sample after correction with retrovirus containing full-length COL7A1 complementary DNA. B, Individual data markers represent the amount of the proviral genome per cell for each patient after infection with retrovirus containing full-length COL7A1 complementary DNA used for LZRSE graft production. Wide horizontal bars indicate means; error bars, SDs.
  • Endoscopic Vein-Graft Harvest Is Safe for CABG Surgery

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2012; 308(5):512-513. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.9079
  • Association Between Endoscopic vs Open Vein-Graft Harvesting and Mortality, Wound Complications, and Cardiovascular Events in Patients Undergoing CABG Surgery

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2012; 308(5):475-484. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.8363
    Williams and coauthors assess the long-term outcomes of endoscopic vs open vein-graft harvesting for Medicare patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in the United States. In the related Editorial, Dacey discusses whether endoscopic harvesting is safe for CABG surgery.
  • JAMA May 2, 2012

    Figure 2: Frequency of Arteriovenous Graft Events

    Primary events indicates thrombosis and radiological or surgical intervention to maintain graft patency. Interventions indicates radiological or surgical interventions to maintain graft patency. Error bars indicate 95%CIs.
  • JAMA May 2, 2012

    Figure 3: Kaplan-Meier Estimates of Time to First Loss of Native Graft Patency, Thrombosis, Intervention, and Cardiovascular Event

    Median time to primary unassisted patency was 354 days in the fish oil group and 176 days in the placebo group. Intervention indicates radiological or surgical intervention to maintain graft patency.
  • Fish Oil and Hemodialysis Graft Patency: Does Time Matter?

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2012; 307(17):1859-1860. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.4101
  • Effect of Fish Oil Supplementation on Graft Patency and Cardiovascular Events Among Patients With New Synthetic Arteriovenous Hemodialysis Grafts: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2012; 307(17):1809-1816. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.3473
    To determine the effect of fish oil on synthetic arteriovenous hemodialysis graft patency and cardiovascular events, Lok and coauthors assigned 201 patients with end-stage renal disease to receive fish oil or matching placebo after graft creation. In a related Editorial, Dixon discusses increasing the use of hemodialysis grafts accompanied by administration of fish oil to prolong graft patency.
  • JAMA December 14, 2011

    Figure 4: Forest Plot Comparing Emergency Coronary Bypass Graft Surgery Rates Following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention at Sites With and Without Surgery

    Odds ratio (OR) estimates with 95% CIs of studies for the outcomes of emergency coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery by indication for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In the case of 0 counts, ORs were calculated by adding 0.5 to all cell counts from the study to avoid division by 0.
  • JAMA April 27, 2011

    Figure 1: Crude Proportion of Patients by Hospitals Receiving In-Hospital Treatments

    Individual hospitals are shown as blue lines; the aggregated data as the black line. The data markers represent the observed proportions for the aggregated data. Only hospital-years with at least 100 patients are included. CABG indicates coronary bypass graft; PCI, percutaneous coronary intervention.
  • Scientists Report Progress on Engineered Blood Vessels

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2011; 305(12):1187-1187. doi: 10.1001/jama.2011.330
  • JAMA January 12, 2011

    Figure 2: Study Graft Patency at 1 Year After Surgery According to Selected Patient Characteristics

    CI indicates confidence interval; LAD, left anterior descending artery.
  • Radial Artery Grafts vs Saphenous Vein Grafts in Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: A Randomized Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2011; 305(2):167-174. doi: 10.1001/jama.2010.1976
  • Hospitalizations for Extreme Conditions Mean Extreme Expenses, Study Verifies

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2010; 304(23):2579-2580. doi: 10.1001/jama.2010.1803
  • Growing Liver Grafts

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2010; 304(7):733-733. doi: 10.1001/jama.2010.1083
  • Association of Caveolin-1 Gene Polymorphism With Kidney Transplant Fibrosis and Allograft Failure

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2010; 303(13):1282-1287. doi: 10.1001/jama.2010.356
  • JAMA November 11, 2009

    Figure 2: Open and Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    A, With open repair, the abdomen is opened anteriorly (as shown) or from a lateral retroperitoneal approach. The aorta is clamped, preferably below the renal arteries, and the common iliac arteries are both clamped. The aneurysm sac is opened longitudinally; backbleeding lumbar arteries and the inferior mesenteric artery are typically suture-ligated. A prosthetic graft is then sutured in place proximally and distally. A bifurcated graft (shown) is used in more than half of cases with the distal anastomoses to the common iliac or, rarely, the common femoral arteries, as opposed to a straight tube graft sewn to the aortic bifurcation. The aneurysm sac is then closed over the graft to provide separation of the graft from the intestines. B, With endovascular repair, stiff wires are introduced through the common femoral arteries over which a fabric covered stent (stent-graft) is introduced. The proximal graft is positioned just below the renal arteries. The stent-graft is initially constrained in a low-profile state until deployment. A modular device is depicted in which a separate component for the left iliac limb is inserted through and overlaps with a docking limb on the main device. Ultimately, there is a seal zone in the normal infrarenal aorta and bilateral iliac arteries, thereby excluding the abdominal aortic aneurysm. See animation of surgical procedures here.