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  • Global Budgets for Safety-Net Hospitals

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(18):1759-1760. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.14957

    This Viewpoint discusses steps necessary to develop an all-payer hospital global budgeting system as one means to incentivize health systems to emphasize preventive care that reduces health service utilization and costs.

  • JAMA September 5, 2017

    Figure 1: Analytic Framework and Key Questions

    Evidence reviews for the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) use an analytic framework to visually display the key questions that the review will address to allow the USPSTF to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a preventive service. The questions are depicted by linkages that relate interventions and outcomes. Further details are available in the USPSTF procedure manual.aAmblyopia risk factors include anisometropia, strabismus, hyperopia, any media opacity, astigmatism, and abnormal visual acuity (which includes substantial isoametropic refractive error). bDetermination of refractive error is based on age-appropriate standards.
  • JAMA July 11, 2017

    Figure 1: Analytic Framework

    Evidence reviews for the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) use an analytic framework to visually display the key questions that the review will address to allow the USPSTF to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a preventive service. The questions are depicted by linkages that relate interventions and outcomes. A dashed line indicates a relationship between an intermediate outcome and a health outcome that is presumed to describe the natural progression of the disease. Further details are available in the USPSTF procedure manual.aHigh risk of cardiovascular disease includes adults with hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, impaired fasting glucose or glucose tolerance, or a combination of these factors.
  • JAMA June 20, 2017

    Figure 1: Analytic Framework

    Evidence reviews for the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) use an analytic framework to visually display the key questions that the review will address to allow the USPSTF to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a preventive service. The questions are depicted by linkages that relate interventions and outcomes. The dashed line indicates a relationship between an intermediate outcome and a health outcome that is presumed to describe the natural progression of the disease. Refer to USPSTF Procedure Manual for further details. BMI indicates body mass index; CV, cardiovascular; KQ, key question; QOL, quality of life.aBlood pressure, lipid levels, and insulin resistance are secondary outcomes when reported with weight.bIncludes academic, social, or physical functioning.
  • Trends in Use of the US Medicare Annual Wellness Visit, 2011-2014

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(21):2233-2235. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.4342

    This study uses Medicare claims data to describe the use of annual wellness visits among Medicare beneficiaries in the United States from 2011 through 2014.

  • JAMA January 24, 2017

    Figure 1: Analytic Framework and Key Questions

    Evidence reviews for the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) use an analytic framework to visually display the key questions that the review will address to allow the USPSTF to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a preventive service. The questions are depicted by linkages that relate interventions and outcomes. A dashed line indicates health outcomes that follow an intermediate outcome. Further details are available from the USPSTF procedure manual.
  • JAMA December 20, 2016

    Figure 1: Analytic Framework and Key Questions

    Evidence reviews for the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) use an analytic framework to visually display the key questions that the review will address to allow the USPSTF to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a preventive service. The questions are depicted by linkages that relate interventions and outcomes. A dashed line indicates health outcomes that follow an intermediate outcome. HSV indicates herpes simplex virus. Further details are available from the USPSTF procedure manual.aStudies that screen using an HSV-2 serologic test alone or a paired (HSV-1 and HSV-2) serologic test will be included if they meet other eligibility criteria; however, only the accuracy of test characteristics related to HSV-2 serologic tests will be evaluated.bKey question 7 will be addressed only if there is insufficient literature for key questions 1 and 5 but sufficient literature for key question 4.
  • JAMA October 25, 2016

    Figure 1: Analytic Framework

    USPSTF indicates US Preventive Services Task Force.Evidence reviews for the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) use an analytic framework to visually display the key questions that the review will address to allow the USPSTF to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a preventive service. The questions are depicted by linkages that relate interventions and outcomes. Dashed line indicates a health outcome that follows an intermediate outcome. Further details are available from the USPSTF procedure manual.
  • Reframing Prevention in the Era of Health Reform

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(10):1039-1040. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.10405

    This Viewpoint discusses progress in disease prevention facilitated by the Affordable Care Act.

  • JAMA September 6, 2016

    Figure 1: Analytic Framework and Key Questions

    Evidence reviews for the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) use an analytic framework to visually display the key questions that the review will address to allow the USPSTF to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a preventive service. The questions are depicted by linkages that relate interventions and outcomes. CDC indicates Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Further details are available from the USPSTF procedure manual.
  • JAMA August 9, 2016

    Figure 1: Analytic Framework and Key Questions

    Evidence reviews for the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) use an analytic framework to visually display the key questions (KQs) that the review will address to allow the USPSTF to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a preventive service. The questions are depicted by linkages that relate interventions and outcomes. Dashed line indicates an association between an intermediate outcome and a health outcome. Further details are available from the USPSTF procedure manual.aIntermediate outcomes include lipid levels (total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) and atherosclerosis markers (carotid intima-media thickness, calcium score, pathological findings).
  • JAMA August 9, 2016

    Figure 1: Analytic Framework

    MI indicates myocardial infarction. Evidence reviews for the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) use an analytic framework to visually display the key questions that the review will address to allow the USPSTF to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a preventive service. The questions are depicted by linkages that relate interventions and outcomes. Dashed line indicates an association between an intermediate outcome and a health outcome. Further details are available from the USPSTF procedure manual.aIntermediate outcomes include lipid levels (total, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and non–high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; triglycerides) and atherosclerosis markers (carotid intima-medial thickness, calcium score, pathological findings).
  • JAMA July 26, 2016

    Figure 1: Analytic Framework and Key Questions

    Evidence reviews for the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) use an analytic framework to visually display the key questions that the review will address to allow the USPSTF to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a preventive service. The questions are depicted by linkages that relate interventions and outcomes. A dashed line indicates health outcomes that follow an intermediate outcome. Further details are available from the USPSTF procedure manual.
  • The US Preventive Services Task Force

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2016; 315(16):1804-1804. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.2663
  • A Public Health Framework for Screening Mammography: Evidence-Based vs Politically Mandated Care

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 315(10):977-978. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.0322

    This Viewpoint highlights the societal risks of politically motivated mandates relating to public health guidelines, in particular the recent mammography screening guidelines.

  • Evidence-Based Clinical Prevention in the Era of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: The Role of the US Preventive Services Task Force

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 314(19):2021-2022. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.13154

    This Viewpoint clarifies US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations as they apply to insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act.

  • Filling the Gaps in Preventive Care Services for Older Adults

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 313(16):1604-1606. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.2369
  • JAMA December 3, 2014

    Figure: Stroke Care Projected to Add Up to More Than Previously Thought

    The long-term cost of care for stroke is greater than initial estimates and underscores the need for timely treatment and preventive care.
  • Too Many Kids Don’t Get Necessary Preventive Services

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 312(20):2084-2084. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.15457
  • Use of Clinical Preventive Services in Infants, Children, and Adolescents

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 312(15):1509-1510. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.12890

    This Viewpoint discusses clinical preventive services in children and adolescents and provides important insights into screening practices in the United States