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  • Total-Body PET Scanner Prototype Due Next Year

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(2):116-116. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.8300
  • A Large Adrenal Tumor With Marked 18 F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(1):84-85. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.6326

    An asymptomatic 56-year-old woman had a nonsecreting heterogeneous adrenal mass with irregular margins and marked 18F-FDG uptake on PET imaging. What would you do next?

  • JAMA June 13, 2017

    Figure 3: Mean Profiles of Markers of Amyloid (Cerebrospinal Fluid Aβ and Florbetapir PET) and Glucose Metabolism (FDG-PET)

    Profiles are from linear mixed-effects models controlling for age and other baseline covariates selected by Akaike Information Criterion. Profiles are conditional on covariates as follows: mean age (74 years) and ventricular volume (2.2% ICV), men, APOEε4=0.5 (APOEε4=0 indicates 0 alleles; APOEε4=1 indicates ≥1 allele). Shaded regions indicate 95% CIs. Dot sizes are proportional to the number of observations. Abbreviations: FDG, fluorodeoxyglucose; PET, positron emission tomography.aSelected covariates were APOEε4 and ventricular volume.bSelected covariates were APOEε4 and sex, and this model did not include longitudinal Pittsburgh Compound B observations.cSelected covariates were APOEε4 and sex.
  • JAMA October 4, 2016

    Figure: Imaging Epigenetics in the Human Brain

    A novel PET imaging probe can be used to visualize epigenetic activity in the human brain.
  • JAMA June 14, 2016

    Figure 1: Clinical Disease Characteristics and Suggested Algorithm for Diagnostic Evaluation of Patients With Symptoms of Polymyalgia Rheumatica or Suspected Giant Cell Arteritis

    The approach incorporates the currently most useful investigations for ascertaining the diagnosis of polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) and exclusion of relevant mimicking conditions. This algorithm is based upon assessment of the available literature. It has not been formally tested in a randomized clinical trial. 18F-FDG-PET indicates fluorodeoxyglucose F 18 positron emission tomography and MRI indicates magnetic resonance imaging.aFrom 40% to 60% of patients diagnosed with GCA also have PMR, and 16% to 21% of PMR patients have GCA.bPMR and GCA (including disease overlap) is possible if there are both typical and atypical symptoms and signs, including normal erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and/or C-reactive protein (CRP), and/or abnormal findings at initial laboratory investigations that prompt further evaluation.cPMR and GCA (including disease overlap) is unlikely (but not ruled out) since inflammatory markers are elevated in more than 90% of patients in both diseases.dPMR and GCA (including disease overlap) is likely if there are typical symptoms and signs including raised ESR, CRP, or both and no abnormal findings that prompt further evaluation.
  • JAMA September 8, 2015

    Figure: Advanced Multimodal Imaging in a Case of a 56-Year-Old Left-Handed Woman With Medically Refractory Epilepsy

    A, Magnetoencephalography identified a few possible abnormal discharges in the left temporal lobe, shown here as fused images with high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical magnetic resonance (MR) images. B, Metabolic imaging with simultaneous 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose–positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (18FDG PET/MRI) demonstrated hypometabolism in the left posterior medial temporal lobe. Arrowheads indicate decreased glucose uptake in the left posterior medial temporal lobe. C, Gradient echo MR image obtained at 7 T demonstrated extensive blood products abutting the left hippocampal tail along with a possible large draining vein. D, MR angiography performed at 7 T showed no abnormal vasculature in the left mesial temporal lobe. E, Task-based fMRI for presurgical planning showed right hemisphere activation corresponding to language eloquent cortex. F, Functional connectivity analysis with resting-state fMRI showed decreased connectivity throughout the default mode network in the left cerebral hemisphere. Surgical resection of the lesion in the left mesial temporal lobe demonstrated a thrombosed arteriovenous malformation.
  • JAMA May 19, 2015

    Figure 2: Prevalence of Amyloid Positivity on PET According to Age for the Different Dementia Diagnostic Groups

    PET indicates positron emission tomography. The curves were plotted using the point estimates generated by generalized estimating equations and are within the age limits of the diagnostic groups. The models were adjusted for study effects. The 95% CIs are presented in Table 2 and eFigure 3 in the Supplement.
  • JAMA May 19, 2015

    Figure 3: Relative Odds of Non–Alzheimer Dementias vs Alzheimer Dementia

    AD indicates Alzheimer disease. The curves were plotted using the point estimates generated by generalized estimating equations and represent odds ratios of amyloid positivity for the different non–AD dementia syndromes (with patients with AD dementia as the reference group) as a function of age. The models include amyloid status on PET (positive or negative), age (as a continuous variable), and an interaction between amyloid status and age. The curves are within the age limits of the diagnostic groups.
  • FDG-PET/CT Imaging for Mediastinal Staging in Patients With Potentially Resectable Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 313(14):1465-1466. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.2365

    This JAMA Clinical Evidence Synopsis summarizes a Cochrane review of the accuracy of 18F-fludeoxyglucose–positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) for distinguishing potentially resectable from nonresectable non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  • JAMA April 14, 2015

    Figure: Sensitivity and Specificity by Subgroup for FDG-PET/CT Imaging for Mediastinal Staging in Patients With Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Source: Data adapted with permission from Wiley. FDG-PET/CT indicates 18F-fludeoxyglucose–positron emission tomography/computed tomography. To convert becquerels (Bq) to curies (Ci), 1 Bq ≈ 2.7 × 10−11 Ci.aCriteria for test positivity refers to criteria used by studies to define a positive FDG-PET/CT result. Lymph node activity > background activity refers to FDG uptake in the lymph node more than background uptake. SUVmax refers to maximum standardized uptake value of FDG.bMixed refers to studies that used more than 1 brand of PET/CT scanner for obtaining the study data, but collapsed the data across all the brands used.
  • JAMA December 3, 2014

    Figure: System Tracks Drug-Resistant Bacteria in the Body

    A novel sorbitol-containing PET tracer helps detect and monitor gram-negative bacterial infections.
  • Accuracy of FDG-PET to Diagnose Lung Cancer in Areas With Infectious Lung Disease: A Meta-analysis

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2014; 312(12):1227-1236. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.11488

    Deppen and coauthors report on the accuracy of positron emission tomography (PET) combined with 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to diagnose lung cancer in areas with infectious lung disease.

  • JAMA September 24, 2014

    Figure 3: Performance of FDG-PET to Diagnose Lung Nodules by Endemic Status for 70 Studies

    The operating points for endemic and nonendemic infectious lung disease studies and 95% confidence and prediction intervals for those operating points are shown. The horizontal box and whiskers plot represents the distribution of study specificity, and the vertical box and whiskers plot represents the distribution of study sensitivity. The box limits are the closest data point to the interquartile range of 25% and 75% with the bar being the median (50%). Error bar whiskers represent the data point closest to 1.5 times the interquartile range and the dots outside the whiskers represent outlier study values. FDG indicates fludeoxyglucose F 18; HSROC, hierarchical summary receiver operator curve; PET, positron emission tomography.
  • JAMA September 24, 2014

    Figure 1: Literature Search of Eligible Studies

    FDG indicates fludeoxyglucose F 18; PET, positron emission tomography.aThe same study could be excluded for multiple reasons.bPopulations subjected to preselection of specific histologies or tumor characteristics in imaging (eg, minimum standard uptake value, ground glass opacity, lesion location).
  • Effect of PET Before Liver Resection on Surgical Management for Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Metastases: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2014; 311(18):1863-1869. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.3740

    Moulton and coauthors report results from a randomized clinical trial on the effect of positron emission tomography (PET) before liver resection on surgical management for colorectal adenocarcinoma metastases.

  • JAMA May 14, 2014

    Figure 2: Overall Survival for All Patients

    The 2-year survival rate was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.75-0.85) for the PET-CT group and 0.80 (95% CI, 0.73-0.87) for the control group. PET-CT indicates positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography.
  • JAMA May 14, 2014

    Figure 3: Overall Survival for Patients Who Had Surgery

    The 2-year survival rate was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.78-0.87) for the PET-CT group and 0.81 (95% CI, 0.74-0.88) for the control group. PET-CT indicates positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography.
  • JAMA April 23, 2014

    Figure: Researchers Test Strategies to Prevent Alzheimer Disease

    Positron emission tomography (PET) amyloid imaging has been associated with the presence and density of beta-amyloid at autopsy (JAMA. 2011;305[3]:275-283). Researchers in the Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer’s (A4) trial are using PET imaging to help identify individuals at risk for Alzheimer disease to test amyloid-modifying therapy.
  • JAMA March 20, 2013

    Figure: PET Imaging for Alzheimer Disease: Are Its Benefits Worth the Cost?

    Positron emission tomography imaging of human brain β-amyloid plaques may be useful for diagnosing and developing treatment strategies for Alzheimer disease.
  • JAMA March 20, 2013

    Figure 2: Example of a False-Positive CT Lung Screening Result

    Annual screening low-dose computed tomography (CT) scans from 2003 (left) and 2004 (right) from a patient at risk for lung cancer. The scan from 2004 shows a spiculated right lung nodule (arrowhead) that was not present in 2003. Because of high suspicion of primary lung cancer, this nodule was further evaluated by a series of tests, including positron emission tomography–CT, CT-guided needle biopsy, and follow-up CT imaging. The nodule eventually resolved on follow-up CT imaging.