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  • Prepregnancy Obesity and Severe Maternal Morbidity: What Can Be Done?

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(18):1765-1766. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.16189
  • Association Between Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and Severe Maternal Morbidity

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    JAMA. 2017; 318(18):1777-1786. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.16191

    This population-based epidemiology study uses Washington State birth and hospitalization data to assess the association between prepregnancy body mass index and severe morbidity or mortality during pregnancy.

  • Maternal Use of Antiepileptic Agents During Pregnancy and Major Congenital Malformations in Children

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(17):1700-1701. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.14485

    This Clinical Evidence Synopsis summarizes a Cochrane review summarizing associations between maternal use of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy and major congenital malformations in children.

  • Trials and Tribulations

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(7):612-613. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.7106
  • Gestational Weight Gain and Outcomes for Mothers and Infants

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(21):2175-2176. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.6265
  • Association of Gestational Weight Gain With Maternal and Infant Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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    JAMA. 2017; 317(21):2207-2225. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.3635

    This meta-analysis evaluates associations between gestational weight gain above or below the Institute of Medicine guidelines and maternal and infant outcomes including size for gestational age, preterm birth, cesarean delivery, and gestational diabetes mellitus.

  • Birth Defects Among Fetuses and Infants of US Women With Evidence of Possible Zika Virus Infection During Pregnancy

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    JAMA. 2017; 317(1):59-68. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.19006

    This study uses 2016 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Zika registry data to describe the proportion of fetuses or infants with birth defects following possible maternal Zika virus infection.

  • JAMA December 27, 2016

    Figure 1: Personal Health Care Spending in the United States by Age Group, Aggregated Condition Category, and Type of Health Care, 2013

    DUBE indicates diabetes, urogenital, blood, and endocrine diseases. Reported in 2015 US dollars. Each of the 3 columns sums to the $2.1 trillion of 2013 spending disaggregated in this study. The length of each bar reflects the relative share of the $2.1 trillion attributed to that age group, condition category, or type of care. Communicable diseases included nutrition and maternal disorders. Table 3 lists the aggregated condition category in which each condition was classified.
  • JAMA December 27, 2016

    Figure 2: Personal Health Care Spending in the United States by Age, Sex, and Aggregated Condition Category, 2013

    DUBE indicates diabetes, urogenital, blood, and endocrine diseases. Reported in 2015 US dollars. Panel A, illustrates health care spending by age, sex, and aggregated condition category. Panel B, illustrates health care spending per capita. Increases in spending along the x-axis show more spending. Communicable diseases included nutrition and maternal disorders. Table 3 lists the aggregated condition category in which each condition was classified.
  • The Good-Enough Parent

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(20):2089-2089. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.10249
  • Primary Care Interventions to Support Breastfeeding: Updated Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force

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    JAMA. 2016; 316(16):1694-1705. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.8882

    This Evidence Report to support an update of the 2008 US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement on interventions to promote and support breastfeeding summarizes current evidence on benefits and harms of interventions during pregnancy and after birth.

  • Limited Infant Protection From Maternal Influenza Immunization

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    JAMA. 2016; 316(8):809-809. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.10786
  • Nondisclosure

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(8):821-821. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.5348
  • Maternal Obesity Affects Sociality of Offspring by Altering Gut Bacteria

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(5):484-484. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.10012
  • Genetic Evidence for Causal Relationships Between Maternal Obesity-Related Traits and Birth Weight

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    JAMA. 2016; 315(11):1129-1140. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.1975

    This genetic epidemiology study uses mendelian randomization to investigate associations between maternal body mass index and glucose and lipid levels and offspring birth weight between 1929 and 2013.

  • Despite Potential Health Benefits of Maternity Leave, US Lags Behind Other Industrialized Countries

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 315(7):643-645. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.18609

    This Medical News & Perspectives article reports on maternity leave in the United States compared with other industrialized countries and how these practices affect the health of new mothers and their infants.

  • Relationship Between Cesarean Delivery Rate and Maternal and Neonatal Mortality

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    JAMA. 2015; 314(21):2263-2270. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.15553

    This ecological study uses World Bank World Development database data to investigate associations between national cesarean delivery rates and maternal and neonatal mortality rates in 194 World Health Organization member countries in 2012.

  • Study Reveals Gaps in Advice to New Mothers on Infant Care

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 314(12):1216-1216. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.11626
  • Effect of Daily Antenatal Iron Supplementation on Plasmodium Infection in Kenyan Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    JAMA. 2015; 314(10):1009-1020. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.9496

    This randomized trial compares the effects of daily iron supplementation vs placebo on maternal Plasmodium infection risk and neonatal outcomes among pregnant women living in a malaria endemic area.

  • JAMA September 8, 2015

    Figure 3: Infant Survival to Discharge By Birth Year and Gestational Age

    Circles show the percent of infants born each year who survived to discharge, a smoothed curve shows the trend, and shading indicates a 95% CI for the curve. Shading is not visible where CIs are close to values on the curve. Percentages are among all infants, including those who died at 12 hours of age or less. Relative risks (RRs) for the change per year were adjusted for study center, maternal race/ethnicity, infant gestational age, small size for gestational age, and sex. Survival trends did not vary significantly by gestational age from 1993-2008 (year-gestational age interaction, P = .46), with no significant change in survival (P = .90), but varied by gestational age from 2009-2012 (year-gestational age interaction, P < .001). Therefore, RRs are shown for 2009 through 2012 only. Total number of infants (mean [range] per year): 1550 (77 [48-96]) for 22 weeks; 3133 (156 [122-189]) for 23 weeks; 4762 (238 [151-334]) for 24 weeks; 5361 (268 [170-339]) for 25 weeks; 5829 (291 [182-361]) for 26 weeks; 6627 (331 [204-399]) for 27 weeks; and 7374 (368 [275-430]) for 28 weeks.