Showing 1 – 20 of 1927
Relevance | Newest | Oldest |
  • Comparison of Hospital Resource Use and Outcomes Among Hospitalists, Primary Care Physicians, and Other Generalists

    Abstract Full Text
    free access is active quiz has multimedia online first
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.5824

    This cohort study uses Medicare claims data to examine differences in health care resource use and outcomes among hospitalized Medicare beneficiaries cared for by hospitalists, their own primary care physicians, or other generalists.

  • Trends and Characteristics of US Medicare Spending on Repository Corticotropin

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(11):1680-1682. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.3631

    This study uses Medicare Drug Spending Dashboard data to estimate the cost of repository corticotropin to the Medicare program and assess its within-specialty prescribing patterns.

  • New (Very High) Prices on Old Drugs

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(11):1568-1568. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.3775
  • Social and Behavioral Determinants of Spending

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(10):1431-1432. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.3325
  • Association Between Extending CareFirst’s Medical Home Program to Medicare Patients and Quality of Care, Utilization, and Spending

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(9):1334-1342. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.2775

    This difference-in-differences analysis tests whether extending CareFirst’s program to Medicare fee-for-service patients improves care processes and reduces hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and spending.

  • Physician Reimbursement in Medicare Advantage Compared With Traditional Medicare and Commercial Health Insurance

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(9):1287-1295. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.2679

    This analysis of claims data compares physician reimbursement in Medicare Advantage, traditional Medicare, and commercial health insurance plans.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine September 1, 2017

    Figure 1: Mean Markup Over Traditional Medicare for Physician Services, for Medicare Advantage and Commercial Patients

    Mean prices relative to traditional Medicare are constructed for each of the 6 years in the study period at the core-based statistical area and are aggregated with weights to reflect the geographic distribution of the private insurer’s Medicare Advantage and commercial utilization, respectively. Symbols indicate the ratios of mean prices from 2007 through 2012, and error bars, the 95% CI. Codes are Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes. ASC indicates ambulatory surgery center; CT, computed tomography; ED, emergency department.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine September 1, 2017

    Figure 2: Mean Markup Over Traditional Medicare for Laboratory Services and Durable Medical Equipment, for Medicare Advantage and Commercial Patients

    Mean prices relative to traditional Medicare are constructed for each of the 6 years in the study period at the core-based statistical area and are aggregated with weights to reflect the geographic distribution of the private insurer’s Medicare Advantage and commercial utilization, respectively. Symbols indicate the ratios of mean prices from 2007 through 2012, and error bars, the 95% CI. Codes are Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System codes. CBC indicates complete blood cell count; CPAP, continuous positive airway pressure.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine September 1, 2017

    Figure 3: Mean Price Paid for Physician Office Visit by Plan Type, for Commercial, Medicare Advantage, and Traditional Medicare Patients

    Mean prices are constructed for each of the 6 years in the study period at the core-based statistical area and are aggregated with weights to reflect the geographic distribution of the private insurer’s Medicare Advantage utilization for the Medicare Advantage and traditional Medicare numbers and with the private insurer’s commercial utilization for the commercial numbers. Enrollment in point of service plans is included in health maintenance organization (HMO) enrollment. PPO indicates preferred provider organization. Error bars indicate 95% CIs.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine September 1, 2017

    Figure 4: Mean Markup Over Traditional Medicare for Physician Visits in the Emergency Department, for Medicare Advantage and Commercial Patients

    Mean prices relative to traditional Medicare are constructed for each of the 6 years in the study period at the core-based statistical area and are aggregated with weights to reflect the geographic distribution of the private insurer’s Medicare Advantage and commercial utilization, respectively. Error bars indicate 95% CIs.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine September 1, 2017

    Figure: Mean (Unadjusted) Number of All-Cause Hospitalizations per 1000 Medicare Patients, by Group and Quarter

    The vertical blue line marks the break between the baseline and intervention periods.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine September 1, 2017

    Figure: Medicaid Enrollees’ Overall Health Care Satisfaction Ratings, 2014-2015

    Data are from the National Medicaid CAHPS survey administered by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to Medicaid enrollees in 46 states and Washington, DC (n = 108 645 in nonexpansion states, and n = 164 034 in expansion states, excluding item nonresponse). Ratings ranged from 0 to 10 for the question, “Using any number from 0 to 10, where 0 is the worst health care possible and 10 is the best health care possible, what number would you use to rate all your health care in the last 6 months?” All estimates use CMS survey weights to account for the sampling design of the CAHPS survey.
  • Temporal Trends in the Numbers of Skilled Nursing Facility Specialists From 2007 Through 2014

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(9):1376-1378. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.2136

    This study of Medicare data quantifies recent increases in health care professionals working exclusively in skilled nursing facilities.

  • Association of Prescription Drug Price Rebates in Medicare Part D With Patient Out-of-Pocket and Federal Spending

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(8):1185-1188. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1885

    This special communication examines the role of prescription drug rebates in driving up Medicare Part D expenditures and consumer out-of-pocket costs.

  • Variation in Emergency Department vs Internal Medicine Excess Charges in the United States

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(8):1139-1145. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1598

    This study compares Medicare charges for common physician services conducted in emergency departments vs those of internal medicine physicians in the United States.

  • Effect of Electronic Reminders, Financial Incentives, and Social Support on Outcomes After Myocardial Infarction: The HeartStrong Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(8):1093-1101. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.2449

    This randomized clinical trial investigates whether a system of medication reminders using financial incentives and social support delays subsequent vascular events in patients following acute myocardial infarction compared with usual care.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine August 1, 2017

    Figure 2: Estimated 2017 Patient Out-of-Pocket Spending for Either Ledipasvir and Sofosbuvir Regimen or Elbasvir and Grazoprevir Regimen

    Data derived from the Medicare Plan Finder for the AARP MedicareRX Saver Plus Part D plan using published methods. Prices were obtained in December 2016, excluded monthly premium amounts, and were applicable to patients not receiving extra help or low-income subsidy from Medicaid or Medicare (approximately 70% of patients enrolled in stand-alone Part D plans).
  • JAMA Internal Medicine August 1, 2017

    Figure 2: Hospital Characteristics Associated With Higher Markup Ratios in Emergency Departments (n = 2707) and Internal Medicine Departments (n = 3669)

    Shown are hospitals’ aggregated markup ratios (median and interquartile range [IQR]) for all services provided in the emergency department (ED) or internal medicine department in 2013. A 1-U increase in the ED markup ratio means that, for every $100 in Medicare-allowable amount billed, the ED charged an additional $100. Multivariable regression coefficients are given in the eTable in the Supplement.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine August 1, 2017

    Figure 3: Cumulative Share of Drug Payments by Payer as Drug Prices Increase

    As a drug’s price increases under the 2017 Part D standard benefit, the cumulative share of Part D spending shifts from plan sponsors and pharmaceutical manufacturers to Medicare. The standard 2017 benefit has a $400 deductible (where the patient pays 100%), and then drug costs are shared between the patient (who pays 25%) and the payer (which pays 75%) during the initial coverage phase until total drug spending reaches $3700. After this limit, the patient, payer, and manufacturer pay 40%, 10%, and 50%, respectively, of branded drug prices during the coverage gap phase (the “donut hole”) until total drug spending reaches $8071. After this point, the patient enters the catastrophic phase in which Medicare bears 80% of costs, plans 15%, and patients 5%, with no upper limit on patient spending.
  • Association of Cost Sharing With Use of Home Health Services Among Medicare Advantage Enrollees

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(7):1012-1018. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1058

    This case-control study examines the association of home health copayments with use of home health service among Medicare Advantage enrollees.