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  • Assessment of Global Kidney Health Care Status

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2017; 317(18):1864-1881. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.4046

    This study surveyed international nephrology society leaders, policy makers, and patient representatives to assess regional resources and ability to care for patients with kidney disease.

  • Clinical Manifestations of Kidney Disease Among US Adults With Diabetes, 1988-2014

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2016; 316(6):602-610. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.10924

    This study uses National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 1988 through 2014 to characterize clinical manifestations of diabetic kidney disease in US adults.

  • JAMA June 28, 2016

    Figure 1: Eligibility, Randomization, and Follow-up for Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP) Intervention Trial (SPRINT) Participants Aged 75 Years or Older

    aSystolic blood pressure was required to be between 130 mm Hg and 180 mm Hg for participants taking 0 or 1 medication, 130 mm Hg to 170 mm Hg for participants taking 2 medications or fewer, 130 mm Hg to 160 mm Hg for participants taking 3 medications or fewer, and 130 mm Hg to 150 mm Hg for participants taking 4 medications or fewer.bIncreased cardiovascular risk was defined as presence of 1 or more of the following: (1) clinical or subclinical cardiovascular disease other than stroke, (2) chronic kidney disease (defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 20 mL/min/1.73 m2 to 59 mL/min/1.73 m2 based on the 4-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation and the latest laboratory value within the past 6 months), (3) Framingham risk score for 10-year cardiovascular risk of 15% or greater based on laboratory work done within the past 12 months for lipids, or (4) age of 75 years or older.
  • Dietary Salt, Kidney Disease, and Cardiovascular Health

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 315(20):2173-2174. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.5985
  • JAMA May 24, 2016

    Figure 1: Flow of Patients Through the ELAIN Trial

    ELAIN indicates Early vs Late Initiation of Renal Replacement Therapy in Critically Ill Patients With Acute Kidney Injury; KDIGO, Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes; RRT, renal replacement therapy; CKD, chronic kidney disease; GFR, glomerular filtration rate; AKI, acute kidney injury; SOFA, sepsis-related organ failure assessment; NGAL, neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin.
  • JAMA May 24, 2016

    Figure 2: Mortality Probability Within 90 Days After Study Enrollment for Patients Receiving Early and Delayed Initiation of Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT)

    KDIGO indicates Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes. In the delayed group, 18 patients had an absolute indication for RRT. The median (quartile 1 [Q1], quartile 3 [Q3]) duration of follow-up was 90 days (Q1, Q3: 90, 90) in the early group and 90 days (Q1, Q3: 90, 90) in the delayed group. The vertical ticks indicate censored cases.
  • Glomerular Filtration Rate and Albuminuria for Detection and Staging of Acute and Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults: A Systematic Review

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    JAMA. 2015; 313(8):837-846. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.0602

    This systematic review summarizes evidence supporting the use of laboratory tests for glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria to detect and stage kidney disease in adults.

  • JAMA January 20, 2015

    Figure 4: Risk of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Events After Hospitalization for All Pneumonia in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    The analysis included 2040 participants (680 pneumonia cases and 1360 controls). The number of participants at risk and those who developed an event over each time interval were estimated using a complete case approach and participants with missing data for covariates were excluded. The estimates were adjusted for age, sex, race, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, plasma total, high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking, alcohol abuse, atrial fibrillation, chronic kidney disease, presence of diagnostic Q waves in electrocardiogram, peripheral arterial disease (defined by ankle brachial index <0.9), carotid artery wall thickness, presence of carotid atherosclerotic plaque by ultrasound, and percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in first second of expiration (FEV1) measured by spirometry. Adjusted hazard ratios were calculated using baseline (at study entry) covariates measurements.
  • JAMA January 20, 2015

    Figure 2: Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Events After Hospitalization for Pneumonia in the Cardiovascular Health Study

    CVD indicates cardiovascular disease. The analysis included 1773 participants (591 pneumonia cases and 1182 controls). Stratified analyses by severity of pneumonia included 633 participants (211 pneumonia cases and 422 controls) for pneumonia with organ dysfunction and 1140 participants (380 pneumonia cases and 422 controls) for pneumonia without organ dysfunction. The number of participants at risk and those who developed an event over each time interval were estimated using a complete case approach and participants with missing data for covariates were excluded. The estimates were adjusted for age, sex, race, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, serum total, high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking, alcohol abuse, atrial fibrillation, chronic kidney disease, serum C-reactive protein, presence of subclinical cardiovascular disease, percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in first second of expiration (FEV1) measured by spirometry, trajectories of activities of daily living and independent activities of daily living over time, and trajectories of modified mini-mental status examination scores over time. Adjusted hazard ratios were calculated using the most recently available measurements before inclusion in the nested analysis cohort.
  • Metformin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

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    JAMA. 2014; 312(24):2668-2675. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.15298

    This systematic review reports that available evidence supports cautious expansion of metformin use in patients with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease.

  • From JAMA’s Daily News Site

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 312(3):221-221. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.8420
  • Certain Gene Variants Associated with Kidney Disease Progression

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 310(24):2606-2606. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.285000
  • Nephrologists Question ACP’s Kidney Disease Guidelines

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 310(22):2387-2388. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.282671
  • JAMA October 23, 2013

    Figure 4: Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate Using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Formula

    Black lines represent median values for the esmolol group; blue, the control group. The shaded areas represent the upper and lower quartiles. Patients receiving renal replacement therapy were excluded from analysis.
  • Kidney Disease and Cardiovascular Risk: Whether Black or White Race Matters

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 310(7):697-698. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.8779
  • JAMA July 10, 2013

    Figure 1: Participant Flow

    NYU indicates New York University; PSA, prostate-specific antigen.aExclusionary medical factors included recent or current history of anemia, iron deficiency problems or subclinical iron deficiency at baseline, diabetes or insulin resistance requiring use of medication, thyroid disease, significant renal impairment, need for a sodium-restricted diet, substantive tendency to be constipated (grade ≥2 experienced regularly), a medical problem precluding the consumption of soy or casein such as allergies to soy or milk protein, and postoperative PSA of 0.07 ng/mL or higher. Fifty-four patients had diabetes, 8 had thyroid disease, 4 had anemia or low iron status, 2 had other malignancies, 1 had renal disease, and 1 had mental disease.bThe 4-month postsurgery deadline had passed for these patients before pathology review could occur.cPreviously undetected exclusionary medical factors included 4 patients who had diabetes, 1 who had thyroid disease, 1 who had anemia, 2 who had protein allergies, 1 who had recurrent constipation, 1 who had a restricted diet, and 1 who had mental disease.dEight eligible participants were referred to the study by participating clinical sites other than NYU and the Manhattan VA; 1 eligible participant was referred to the study by a urologist in private practice. All 9 participants were confirmed to be at high risk by pathology review.eThe median time between surgery and randomization was identical in both groups (14 weeks; 95% CI, 13.1-14.1; range, 7 or 8 to 18 weeks).
  • Selections From News@JAMA and JAMA Forum

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 309(21):2203-2203. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.6396
  • JAMA October 17, 2012

    Figure 1: Development of Stage 2 or 3 Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) While in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU)

    Stage 2 or 3 defined according to the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes clinical practice guideline.
  • Comparison of Risk Prediction Using the CKD-EPI Equation and the MDRD Study Equation for Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2012; 307(18):1941-1951. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.3954
    Matsushita and coauthors for the Chronic Kidney Disease Prognosis Consortium conducted a meta-analysis of data from 1.1 million adults to evaluate the risk implications of estimated glomerular filtration rate using 2 different equations. In an accompanying editorial, Kalantar-Zadeh and Amin discuss the use of estimated glomerular filtration rate in diagnosing chronic kidney disease.
  • JAMA May 9, 2012

    Figure 1: Distribution in General Population Cohorts for Estimated GFR and Adjusted Hazard Ratios (HRs) of All-Cause Mortality, Cardiovascular Mortality, and End-Stage Renal Disease

    A, Distribution based on kernel density estimation (proportion is for each integer estimated glomerular filtration rate [GFR]). Dotted vertical lines define GFR categories used for chronic kidney disease staging. B-D, Error bars indicate 95% confidence intervals for estimated GFR by the CKD-EPI equation. Tinted bands indicate 95% confidence intervals for estimated GFR by the MDRD Study equation. Reference (open circle) is estimated GFR of 95 mL/min/1.73 m2. The filled circles (black and blue dots) represent statistical significance (P <.05). Adjustments were made for age, sex, race/ethnicity, smoking, history of cardiovascular disease, systolic blood pressure, diabetes, serum total cholesterol concentration, body mass index, and albuminuria. CKD-EPI indicates Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration; MDRD, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease.