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  • JAMA August 1, 2017

    Figure 3: Time From Randomization to First Primary Composite Outcome of 40% eGFR Decrease, ESKD, or Death Due to Kidney Failure, by Treatment Group

    Hazard ratio, 0.37 [95% CI, 0.17-0.85]; P = .02. Median at-risk duration of follow-up was 22.2 (interquartile range, 14.9-30.4) months for methylprednisolone and 22.4 (interquartile range, 14.3 to 30.9) months for placebo. eGFR indicates estimated glomerular filtration rate; ESKD, end-stage kidney disease.
  • JAMA May 9, 2017

    Figure 1: Global Prevalence of Treated End-Stage Renal Disease Per 1 Million Population

    The map depicts the prevalence of treated kidney failure per 1 million population based on individual country data. Data not available indicates that data were either not known or not provided on the questionnaire for countries that received the survey.
  • Acute Anuric Renal Failure in an 80-Year-Old Man

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(14):1471-1472. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.0704

    An 80-year-old man with stage 4 chronic kidney disease, 2 days of anuria, and an elevated serum κ to λ free light chain ratio had a bone marrow biopsy that stained positive for the plasma cell marker CD138. What would you do next?

  • JAMA December 13, 2016

    Figure 1: Flow of Patients Through the GLAGOV Randomized Clinical Trial

    aPatients could be excluded for more than 1 reason; therefore, the sum of the criteria may be greater than the number of patients. CETP indicates cholesterylester transfer protein; GLAGOV, Global Assessment of Plaque Regression With a PCSK9 Antibody as Measured by Intravascular Ultrasound; IVUS, intravascular ultrasonography; LDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.bLDL-C level 80 mg/dL (2.07 mmol/L) or greater, with or without risk factors; less than 60 mg/dL (1.55 mmol/L); or 60 mg/dL or greater to less than 80 mg/dL.cClinically significant heart disease (154), hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism (38), type 1 diabetes (27), history of malignancy (16), fasting triglyceride level greater than 400 mg/dL (4.52 mmol/L) (15), active liver disease or hepatic dysfunction (11), uncontrolled cardiac arrhythmia (4), creatine kinase level greater than 3 times upper limit of normal (2), history of hereditary muscular disorders (2), known active infection or systemic dysfunctions (2), New York Heart Association III or IV heart failure or left ventricular ejection fraction less than 30% (2), severe renal dysfunction (1), uncontrolled hypertension (1).
  • JAMA August 2, 2016

    Figure 3: Kidney Failure–Free Days by Randomized Treatment Group

    The column at 28 days represents survivors who never developed kidney failure, other columns represent patients who did not survive, who experienced kidney failure, or both at any time.
  • Effect of Early Vasopressin vs Norepinephrine on Kidney Failure in Patients With Septic Shock: The VANISH Randomized Clinical Trial

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    JAMA. 2016; 316(5):509-518. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.10485

    This randomized clinical trial compares the effect of vasopressin vs norepinephrine on kidney failure in patients with septic shock.

  • Multinational Assessment of Accuracy of Equations for Predicting Risk of Kidney Failure: A Meta-analysis

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    JAMA. 2016; 315(2):164-174. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.18202

    This meta-analysis involving 721 357 patients across 31 cohorts and 30 countries evaluated the accuracy of kidney failure risk equations to predict the 2-year and 5-year probability of kidney failure in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  • JAMA January 12, 2016

    Figure 4: Refit Baseline Hazard of Original 4-Variable Equation at 2 and 5 Years in Individual Cohorts Stratified by Region

    Thin black line represents the centered baseline hazard for the original 4-variable kidney failure risk equation (age 70 years; male, 56%; eGFR, 36 mL/min/1.73 m2; urine albumin to creatinine ratio, 170 mg/g); the orange and blue horizontal lines represent the weighted mean refit baseline hazard within each region (North America and non-North America). The 25 cohorts included represent studies with available urine albumin to creatinine ratio. Studies with dipstick proteinuria were not included in the calculation. See Table 1 footnotes for expansion of cohort abbreviations.
  • Stomatitis, Cutaneous Bullae, and Renal Failure

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 314(21):2296-2297. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.10735

    A 64-year-old African American woman presented with crusted scalp plaques, erosive stomatitis, and multiple bullae, erosions, and hyperpigmented patches on her trunk and extremities. Her serum creatinine level was 7.1 mg/dL; a complete blood cell count was unremarkable. What would you do next?

  • Blood Pressure Lowering in Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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    JAMA. 2015; 313(6):603-615. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.18574

    This systematic review and meta-analysis assesses the association between several means of blood pressure–lowering treatment and vascular disease in patients with diabetes.

  • JAMA February 10, 2015

    Figure 2: Standardized Associations Between 10–mm Hg Lower Systolic BP and All-Cause Mortality, Macrovascular Outcomes, and Microvascular Outcomes in Diabetic Patients

    Macrovascular outcomes include cardiovascular events, coronary heart disease, stroke, and heart failure; and microvascular outcomes include renal failure, retinopathy, and albuminuria. The area of each square is proportional to the inverse variance of the estimate. Horizontal lines indicate 95% CIs of the estimate. BP indicates blood pressure.
  • JAMA February 10, 2015

    Figure 3: Standardized Associations Between 10–mm Hg Lower Systolic BP and All-Cause Mortality, Macrovascular Outcomes, and Microvascular Outcomes Stratified by Mean Systolic BP of Trial Participants at Entry

    Macrovascular outcomes include cardiovascular events, coronary heart disease, stroke, and heart failure; and microvascular outcomes include renal failure, retinopathy, and albuminuria. Mean baseline blood pressure (BP) is weighted by number of participants. The area of each square is proportional to the inverse variance of the estimate. Horizontal lines indicate 95% CIs of the estimate. SBP indicates systolic blood pressure.
  • JAMA February 10, 2015

    Figure 4: Standardized Associations Between 10–mm Hg Lower Systolic BP and All-Cause Mortality, Macrovascular Outcomes, and Microvascular Outcomes, Stratified by Mean Achieved Systolic BP in the Active Group of Each Trial

    Macrovascular outcomes include cardiovascular events, coronary heart disease, stroke, and heart failure; and microvascular outcomes include renal failure, retinopathy, and albuminuria. The mean achieved blood pressure (BP) is weighted by number of participants. The area of each square is proportional to the inverse variance of the estimate. Horizontal lines indicate 95% CIs of the estimate. SBP indicates systolic blood pressure.
  • JAMA December 3, 2014

    Figure: Example of Relationship of Risk Factors With Lifetime Benefit of Colorectal Cancer Screening With Colonoscopy

    CRC indicates colorectal cancer; RR, relative risk.aIndividuals are classified as having moderate comorbidity if diagnosed with an ulcer, rheumatologic disease, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes, paralysis, or cerebrovascular disease and in case of a history of acute myocardial infarction; as having severe comorbidity if diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, moderate or severe liver disease, chronic renal failure, dementia, cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis, or AIDS; and as having no comorbidity if none of these conditions is present.bThe range of the background risk for CRC is based on the National Cancer Institute’s Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool. In white women, the minimum background risk for CRC is 0.5, the maximum background risk in the absence of a family history of CRC is 1.8, and the maximum risk in the presence of a family history of CRC is 3.5.
  • Low-Dose Dopamine or Low-Dose Nesiritide in Acute Heart Failure With Renal Dysfunction: The ROSE Acute Heart Failure Randomized Trial

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    JAMA. 2013; 310(23):2533-2543. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.282190

    To examine the effect of low-dose dopamine or low-dose nesiritide added to diuretic therapy on decongestion and renal function in patients with acute heart failure, Chen and coauthors conducted a randomized clinical trial in 360 patients with heart failure and renal dysfunction in North America.

  • Management of Gout: A 57-Year-Old Man With a History of Podagra, Hyperuricemia, and Mild Renal Insufficiency

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    JAMA. 2012; 308(20):2133-2141. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.65028
    Mr R, a 57-year-old man, has a history of podagra, hyperuricemia, and mild renal insufficiency. Shmerling discusses the clinical features and diagnosis of gout as well as treatment and prevention of gout attacks.
  • Rates of Treated and Untreated Kidney Failure in Older vs Younger Adults

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    JAMA. 2012; 307(23):2507-2515. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.6455
    Among a population-based cohort of 1816824 adults in Alberta, Canada, Hemmelgarn and coauthors evaluate the extent to which age is associated with the likelihood of treatment of kidney failure.
  • Treated and Untreated Kidney Failure in Older Adults: What's the Right Balance?

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2012; 307(23):2545-2546. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.6667
  • Rare E coli Strain Races Through Europe; High Rate of Kidney Failure Reported

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2011; 306(1):29-29. doi: 10.1001/jama.2011.889
  • JAMA April 20, 2011

    Figure: Observed vs Predicted Probability of Kidney Failure at 3 Years Using Models 2, 3, and 6 in the Validation Cohort

    The predicted and observed event probability estimates represent the mean predicted probability from the Cox proportional hazards regression model and the mean observed probability from the population (Kaplan-Meier estimate) divided into quintiles of predicted probability. Predicted risk categories for quintiles 1 through 5 correspond with 0% to 4.3%, 4.4% to 8.1%, 8.2% to 12.9%, 13.0% to 24.5%, and 24.6% to 53.9%, respectively, for model 2; 0% to 1.6%, 1.7% to 5.3%, 5.4% to 11.0%, 11.1% to 23.1%, 23.2% to 61.7%, respectively, for model 3; and 0% to 1.4%, 1.4% to 4.8%, 4.9% to 10.7%, 10.8% to 24.0%, 24.1% to 61.6%, respectively, for model 6. Nam and D’Agostino χ2 statistic is 37, 32, and 19 for models 2, 3, and 6, respectively.