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  • Effect of Low-Dose Ferrous Sulfate vs Iron Polysaccharide Complex on Hemoglobin Concentration in Young Children With Nutritional Iron-Deficiency Anemia: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(22):2297-2304. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.6846

    This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of ferrous sulfate vs iron polysaccharide complex on nutritional iron-deficiency anemia among infants and children aged 9 to 48 months receiving care at an outpatient hematology clinic at a US tertiary care hospital.

  • Effect of Oral Iron Repletion on Exercise Capacity in Patients With Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction and Iron Deficiency: The IRONOUT HF Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2017; 317(19):1958-1966. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.5427

    This randomized clinical trial investigates the efficacy of oral iron supplementation for improvement of exercise capacity in adult patients with heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction.

  • JAMA March 15, 2016

    Figure 2: Neck Pain, Stiffness, and Periorbital Edema in a Man With Diabetes

    Biopsy of skin from the upper back. Swollen collagen fibers (yellow arrowheads) separated by widened spaces filled with mucin (black arrowhead). There is normal cellularity of the dermis and no increase in fibroblasts (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×4). Inset: colloidal iron stain highlights increased mucin deposition (black arrowhead) between the collagen bundles (yellow arrowhead) (original magnification ×20).
  • Comparative Risk of Anaphylactic Reactions Associated With Intravenous Iron Products

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2015; 314(19):2062-2068. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.15572

    This retrospective investigation of Medicare claims data compared the risk of anaphylaxis among intravenous iron products.

  • JAMA November 17, 2015

    Figure 1: Trend of First-Time Use by IV Iron Product

    IV indicates intravenous.
  • JAMA September 8, 2015

    Figure 1: Participant Flow in Trial of Iron Supplementation During Pregnancy

    aDuring the study, women entered the cohort as they immigrated into the study area or attained the minimum eligible age (15 years) and left the cohort as they emigrated or attained the maximum eligible age (45 years).bSample sizes <215 are due to missing data, which varied by outcome. In the intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis, missing values were replaced by multiple imputation.cMaternal samples were collected at delivery so that primary outcome could be established.
  • JAMA September 8, 2015

    Figure 2: Effect of Iron Supplementation on Selected Outcomes by Subgroup

    Analyses were by intention-to-treat, with multiple imputations to replace missing values. Where pooling of results from multiple imputations led to noninteger counts, we rounded those values. P values indicate the 2-sided probability that group effects are as different as observed or more extreme when assuming that they are identical. Dashed lines indicate overall effect; solid lines, no effect.aAnalysis restricted to those who were iron-deficient or iron-replete.
  • JAMA September 8, 2015

    Figure 3: Effect of Iron Supplementation on Selected Outcomes by Use of Intermittent Preventive Treatment

    Analyses were by intention-to-treat, with multiple imputations to replace missing values. Where pooling of results from multiple imputations led to noninteger counts, we rounded those values. P values indicate the 2-sided probability that group effects are as different as observed or more extreme when assuming that they are identical. Dashed lines indicate overall effect; solid lines, no effect; IPT, intermittent preventive treatment.
  • Effect of Daily Antenatal Iron Supplementation on Plasmodium Infection in Kenyan Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2015; 314(10):1009-1020. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.9496

    This randomized trial compares the effects of daily iron supplementation vs placebo on maternal Plasmodium infection risk and neonatal outcomes among pregnant women living in a malaria endemic area.

  • Antenatal Iron Use in Malaria Endemic Settings: Evidence of Safety?

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 314(10):1003-1005. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.10032
  • Oral Iron Supplementation After Blood Donation: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2015; 313(6):575-583. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.119

    This randomized trial found that among blood donors with normal hemoglobin levels, low-dose iron supplementation reduced time to recovery of hemoglobin concentration.

  • JAMA February 10, 2015

    Figure 1: Hemoglobin and Iron Recovery Study (HEIRS) Flow Diagram

    aAll participants had data from ≥6 follow-up visits; 3 individuals had 6 visits, and 93 had 7 visits.bAll participants had data from ≥6 follow-up visits; 5 individuals had 6 visits, and 92 had 7 visits.
  • JAMA February 10, 2015

    Figure 3: Mean Ferritin Level for Each Group vs Time Since Donation

    After a donor gives 500 mL of whole blood, ferritin decreases by approximately 30 ng/mL over a 30-day period, as depicted in the no-iron, iron-replete group (open triangles). Each ng/mL of ferritin equates to 8 to 10 mg of storage iron; thus, 30 × 8 mg = 240 mg, approximately the amount of iron contained in each unit of blood. Reconstitution of storage iron was not observed until after recovery of hemoglobin, as indicated in the upward change in slope of the ferritin recovery curve in the no-iron, higher-ferritin group, at approximately day 84. Dotted line indicates 26 ng/mL, the value used to stratify iron-deficient and iron-replete donors at enrollment; error bars, 95% confidence intervals.
  • JAMA February 10, 2015

    Figure 4: Mean Time to 80% Hemoglobin Recovery by Quartile of Ferritin and Treatment Assignment

    The confidence intervals are censored at the end of follow-up at 168 days. No mean is shown for the lowest ferritin quartile for participants not taking iron because the mean was longer than 168 days.
  • JAMA February 10, 2015

    Figure 2: Time to Hemoglobin Recovery According to Treatment and Baseline Ferritin Level

    A, Mean hemoglobin for each group vs time since donation. Time “0” is the day of donation. B, Hemoglobin expressed as a percentage of initial hemoglobin value. Hemoglobin recovery was significantly higher than baseline in the low-ferritin group (≤26 ng/mL) who took iron (mean, 106.0%; 95% CI, 104.3%-107.7%; P < .001) and significantly lower than baseline in the higher-ferritin group (>26 ng/mL) who took no iron (mean, 98.1%; 95% CI, 96.6%-99.6%; P = .02). Dotted line indicates 100% of initial hemoglobin value; error bars, 95% confidence intervals.
  • JAMA December 24, 2014

    Figure 1: Maternal Multiple Micronutrient vs Iron–Folic Acid Supplementation Trial Flow Diagram

    Study area comprised 596 study-defined clusters (sectors) in 19 contiguous unions (18 in Gaibandha, 1 in Rangpur) selected for contiguity, population size, and rural typology. Prelisted women who moved, became menopausal or sterilized, refused, were no longer wed, or died by start-up of the trial were deemed ineligible. For primary outcome of infant mortality to age 6 months (180 days), 5 children with missing vital status were assumed alive and included in analysis.
  • Effect of Maternal Multiple Micronutrient vs Iron–Folic Acid Supplementation on Infant Mortality and Adverse Birth Outcomes in Rural Bangladesh: The JiVitA-3 Randomized Trial

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2014; 312(24):2649-2658. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.16819

    This randomized trial reports that antenatal multiple micronutrient compared with iron–folic acid supplementation did not reduce infant mortality to age 6 months but resulted in a non–statistically significant reduction in stillbirths and significant reductions in preterm births and low birth weight.

  • The Smiths : W. Blair Bruce

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 312(3):214-215. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.279615
  • Untitled : Lee Bontecou

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 311(7):654-655. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.279334