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  • JAMA April 25, 2017

    Figure 2: Time to Colonoscopy After a Positive FIT and Adjusted Riska of Advanced Adenoma, Any Colorectal Cancer, and Advanced-Stage Colorectal Cancer

    BMI indicates body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared); FIT, fecal immunochemical test; OR, odds ratio. Models for any colorectal cancer include the entire population. Advanced adenoma was defined as adenomas with advanced histology (ie, tubulovillous and villous adenomas). Models for advanced adenoma exclude 2191 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Advanced-stage cancers were defined as stage III (regional lymph node involvement) or stage IV (distant metastasis) according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system or, for those without such staging, as code 3 (disease in the regional lymph nodes), code 4 (regional disease with direct extension and spread to the regional lymph nodes), or code 7 (distant metastasis) according to the 2013 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Coding and Staging Manual. Models for advanced-stage colorectal cancer exclude 14 patients with colorectal cancer of unknown stage. The adjusted advanced-stage colorectal cancer model dropped 244 patients with unknown BMI because no patient with unknown BMI had this outcome. aAdjusted for sex; age; race/ethnicity; BMI; region; FIT screening year; completion of previous FIT screening (ever and in the prior year); and in the year prior to FIT screening, receipt of the flu or pneumonia vaccine, presence of gastrointestinal symptoms (bleeding or blood in stool, unexplained weight loss, abdominal pain, diarrhea, diverticulitis, inflammatory bowel disease, or Lynch syndrome), diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia or diabetes, current smoker, number of primary care visits, and number of days hospitalized.bRates (95% CIs) were per 1000 patients who had a colonoscopy after a positive FIT.
  • JAMA April 25, 2017

    Figure 3: Time to Colonoscopy After a Positive FIT and Adjusted Riska of Colorectal Cancer Stages 0-IV

    BMI indicates body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared); FIT, fecal immunochemical test; OR, odds ratio. Models for stage-specific colorectal cancer exclude patients with colorectal cancer of any stage other than the specified stage. The adjusted models for colorectal cancer stages 0, III, and IV dropped 242 patients with unknown BMI because no patient with unknown BMI had these outcomes. The adjusted colorectal cancer stage IV model dropped 2435 patients with unknown race/ethnicity because no patient with unknown race/ethnicity had this outcome.aAdjusted for sex; age; race/ethnicity; BMI; region; FIT screening year; completion of previous FIT screening (ever and in the prior year); and in the year prior to FIT screening, receipt of the flu or pneumonia vaccine, presence of gastrointestinal symptoms (bleeding or blood in stool, unexplained weight loss, abdominal pain, diarrhea, diverticulitis, inflammatory bowel disease, or Lynch syndrome), diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia or diabetes, current smoker, number of primary care visits, and number of days hospitalized.bRates (95% CIs) were per 1000 patients who had a colonoscopy after a positive FIT.
  • Least Severe Flu Season in 3 Years

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(4):386-386. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.9300
  • Influenza Hits Poor People Hardest

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 315(12):1221-1221. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.2405
  • Effect of Behavioral Interventions on Inappropriate Antibiotic Prescribing Among Primary Care Practices: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    JAMA. 2016; 315(6):562-570. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.0275

    This cluster randomized clinical trial compares the effects of behavioral interventions on rates of inappropriate (not guideline-concordant) antibiotic prescribing during ambulatory visits for acute respiratory tract infections.

  • JAMA October 13, 2015

    Figure: Patient Flowchart in Study of Influenza Vaccination and Influenza Pneumonia

    Research sites B and D enrolled only children, site A enrolled only adults, and site C enrolled both children and adults.aInfluenza infection status could not be determined for 91 patients (1.8% of total enrolled), including patients without samples available for testing and patients with samples collected after 72 hours of admission or with missing data on the time of sample collection.bNoninfluenza respiratory viruses.
  • Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza 2014-2015

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 313(4):413-414. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.18380

    This article reviews the antiviral drugs available to treat influenza this season—including oseltamivir and zanamivir—as well as their indications and possible adverse effects.

  • Vaccinated Populations Can Get Flu

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 312(24):2610-2610. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.16349
  • Expanding the Options for Confronting Pandemic Influenza

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 312(14):1401-1402. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.12558
  • From JAMA’s Daily News Site

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 312(9):881-881. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.10558
  • Severe Flu Season in California

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 311(18):1849-1849. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.3529
  • Critically Ill Patients With Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus Infection in 2014

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 311(13):1289-1290. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.2116
  • First Human Influenza A(H5N1) Case Reported in North America

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 311(7):668-668. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.571
  • 2009 Influenza Pandemic’s Death Rate Higher Than Previously Reported

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 311(3):235-235. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.285364
  • More Attention Needed for Children at High Risk of Flu Complications

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 310(18):1913-1913. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.280673
  • Managing the Human Toll Caused by Seasonal Influenza: New York State’s Mandate to Vaccinate or Mask

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 310(17):1797-1798. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.280633
  • Association Between Influenza Vaccination and Cardiovascular Outcomes in High-Risk Patients: A Meta-analysis

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2013; 310(16):1711-1720. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.279206

    Dr Udell and coauthors determine if influenza vaccination is associated with prevention of cardiovascular events from randomized clinical trials comparing influenza vaccine vs placebo or control in high-risk cardiovascular patients. In an Editorial, Neuzil discusses the trial limitations in establishing the level of protection of a vaccine from the perspective of public health and offers proven methods to increase vaccination coverage for the 2013-2014 influenza season.

  • Brief Travel to Subtropical Areas Imports Flu, Researchers Say

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 310(4):363-363. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.8507
  • Preparedness Key to Combating Potential Pandemic Resulting From Any New Influenza Strain

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 310(1):18-19. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.7130
  • Building Trust in the Power of “Big Data” Research to Serve the Public Good

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 309(23):2443-2444. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.5914