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  • Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Mendelian Conditions

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    JAMA. 2017; 318(9):859-860. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.10892

    This JAMA Insights article explains how preimplantation genetic diagnosis can help reduce the risk of inherited genetic conditions among newborns.

  • In Vitro Fertilization Insurance Coverage and Chances of a Live Birth

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    JAMA. 2017; 317(12):1273-1275. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.0727

    This study compares the cumulative probability of live birth among women with and without in vitro fertilization insurance coverage at a university-affiliated reproductive medicine center.

  • JAMA July 19, 2016

    Figure: Identification of the OMEGA Study Cohort for Assessment of Breast Cancer Risk Following In Vitro Fertilization (IVF)

    Adapted from Spaan et al.aAccording to the treatment center where these women were identified.bWomen who were originally included in the non-IVF group but subsequently received IVF (eg, in another IVF clinic; n = 911 + 41 = 952) contributed person-time to both the non-IVF group and IVF group.cWomen in this category contributed person-time from the first IVF treatment or first gynecological visit until date of death.dFor unknown reasons, these women had originally not been identified as belonging in the IVF group; the women did not contribute person-time to the non-IVF group because IVF treatment was administered before 1989.
  • Ovarian Stimulation for In Vitro Fertilization and Long-term Risk of Breast Cancer

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    JAMA. 2016; 316(3):300-312. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.9389

    This cohort study uses Netherlands Cancer Registry data to compare the long-term risk of breast cancer among subfertile women treated with ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization (IVF) vs non-IVF treatment between 1980 and 1995.

  • Cultural Influences Reflected in Divergent US vs UK Human Embryo Research Policies

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    JAMA. 2016; 315(17):1822-1823. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.3020
  • JAMA January 26, 2016

    Figure 1: The VDAART Participant Flow

    IVF indicates in vitro fertilization.
  • JAMA December 22, 2015

    Figure 4: Live-Birth Rate Within Each Single In Vitro Fertilization Treatment Cycle by Oocyte Retrieval in First Cycle

    The live-birth rate within each individual first, second, and third treatment cycle (ie, for each curve, the rate on the y-axis is the rate for just that 1 treatment cycle) according to the number of oocytes retrieved in the first treatment cycle. Analyses are for 134 903 women younger than 40 years using their own oocytes. Box and whiskers indicate the central 95% of the distribution of oocytes retrieved in the first cycle, as well as the median and lower and upper quartiles.
  • Repeated In Vitro Fertilization Cycles for Infertility

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    JAMA. 2015; 314(24):2627-2629. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.17297
  • Live-Birth Rate Associated With Repeat In Vitro Fertilization Treatment Cycles

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    JAMA. 2015; 314(24):2654-2662. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.17296

    This study uses national United Kingdom in vitro fertilization (IVF) data to investigate the live-birth rate per IVF cycle and cumulative live-birth rate across all cycles by women’s age and treatment type between 2003 and 2010.

  • JAMA December 22, 2015

    Figure 1: Definition of Eligible and Analysis Cohort

    IVF indicates in vitro fertilization.
  • JAMA December 22, 2015

    Figure 2: Cumulative Live-Birth Rate Across All Initiated IVF Cycles by Age and Oocyte Source

    The prognosis-adjusted estimate of cumulative live-birth rate (ie, the rate shown on the y-axis is the likelihood of a live birth across all initiated cycles up to and including the numbers on the x-axis), with 95% confidence intervals (error bars). These are presented for women in 2 different age categories at the start of their first in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment cycle (<40 years and 40-42 years; women in both of these categories used their own oocytes) and also in women who used donor oocytes (these women cover the full age range). Data for women older than 42 years at their first treatment cycle are not shown because rates were so low it would have been difficult to represent them on this same graph (full results for these women are shown in Table 3). The prognostic-adjusted estimate assumes that 30% of those who discontinued IVF did so because of poor prognosis and that the live-birth rate in that 30% would have been 0 had they continued. Analyses were completed for 156 947 women undergoing 257 398 cycles. Log-rank tests indicated a difference between the cumulative live-birth rates for all groups (P < .001 for all comparisons).
  • JAMA December 22, 2015

    Figure 3: Cumulative Live-Birth Rate Across All Initiated IVF Cycles by ICSI and Sperm Donation

    The prognosis-adjusted estimates of cumulative live-birth rates (ie, the rate shown on the y-axis is the likelihood of a live birth across all initiated cycles up to and including the numbers on the x-axis), with 95% confidence intervals (error bars). These are shown for couples without a male-partner cause of infertility, couples with a male cause who were not treated with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) or sperm donation, those with a male cause who were treated with ICSI, and those with a male cause who used sperm donation. The prognostic-adjusted estimate assumes that 30% of those who discontinued in vitro fertilization (IVF) did so because of poor prognosis and that the live-birth rate in that 30% would have been 0 had they continued. Analyses were completed for 156 947 women undergoing 257 398 cycles. Log-rank tests indicated a difference between the cumulative live-birth rates for all groups (P < .001 for all comparisons).
  • JAMA August 18, 2015

    Figure: Proposed Algorithm for Treatment of Septic Shock

    ECG indicates electrocardiogram; ECHO, echocardiogram; IVF, intravenous fluids; LV/RV, left ventricular/right ventricular; MAP, mean arterial pressure; PCA pulse contour analysis; SBP, systolic blood pressure; ScvO2, continuous central venous oxygen saturation.aTissue hypoperfusion typically manifests as altered mentation, low urinary output, poor peripheral perfusion, and/or hyperlactemia (≥2.0 mmol/L).bNorepinephrine may not always be the first choice in setting of tachycarrythmias or atrial fibrillation; consider adding vasopressin for norepinephrine rates that exceed 15 μg/kg/min.cThe choice for fluid repletion and type will be refined by ongoing safety checks for pulmonary edema/fluid overload, metabolic derangements from unbalanced crystalloids, and ongoing losses.
  • Outcomes of Fresh and Cryopreserved Oocyte Donation

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    JAMA. 2015; 314(6):623-624. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.7556

    This study used data from the 2013 annual report of US in vitro fertilization center outcomes published by the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology to compare live birth and cycle cancellation rates using either fresh or cryopreserved donor oocytes.

  • Trends in Use of and Reproductive Outcomes Associated With Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection

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    JAMA. 2015; 313(3):255-263. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.17985

    In this retrospective cohort study assessing national trends and reproductive outcomes for fresh in vitro fertilization (IVF) following use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), ICSI use increased significantly but was not associated with improved postfertilization reproductive outcomes.

  • JAMA January 20, 2015

    Figure 1: Use of ICSI Among Fresh IVF Cycles With and Without Male Factor Infertility, 1996-2012

    ICSI indicates intracytoplasmic sperm injection; IVF, in vitro fertilization.
  • JAMA January 20, 2015

    Figure 2: Use of ICSI Among Fresh IVF Cycles With Non–Male Factor Infertility by Type of Indication, 1996-2012

    ART indicates assisted reproductive technology; ICSI, intracytoplasmic sperm injection; IVF, in vitro fertilization.
  • Safety of Assisted Reproductive Technology in the United States, 2000-2011

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    JAMA. 2015; 313(1):88-90. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.14488
  • JAMA April 16, 2014

    Figure 1: Study Selection for Maternal BMI and the Risk of Fetal Death, Stillbirth, and Infant Death

    BMI indicates body mass index; ICSI, intracytoplasmic sperm injection; IVF, in vitro fertilization; SIDS, sudden infant death syndrome.aExact reasons for exclusions were not documented.
  • Trends and Outcomes for Donor Oocyte Cycles in the United States, 2000-2010

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    JAMA. 2013; 310(22):2426-2434. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.280924

    To quantify trends in donor oocyte cycles in the United States and determine predictors of a good perinatal outcome among in vitro fertilization cycles using noncryopreserved embryos from donor oocytes, Kawwass and coauthors analyzed data from the National Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance System. Myers provides comment in the related Editorial.