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  • JAMA March 14, 2017

    Figure: Ebola Glycoprotein–Specific Antibody Responses for Vaccine Recipients in Randomized Groups at 1 Year (Day 360)

    Day 1 is baseline, the day of first vaccination. For numbers of participants included at each time point, see Table. Error bars indicate 95% CIs; Ad26.ZEBOV, adenovirus-type 26 vector vaccine encoding Ebola glycoprotein; MVA-BN-Filo, modified vaccinia Ankara vector vaccine, encoding glycoproteins from the Ebola, Sudan, Marburg, and Tai Forest virus nucleoprotein.
  • Trial Launched to Eradicate Ebola From Semen

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(8):809-809. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.11464
  • CDC’s Historic Response to Ebola

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(8):810-810. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.10955
  • Safety and Immunogenicity of Novel Adenovirus Type 26– and Modified Vaccinia Ankara–Vectored Ebola Vaccines: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2016; 315(15):1610-1623. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.4218

    This phase 1 randomized clinical trial investigated the safety and tolerability of 2 vaccines against Ebola virus: an adenovirus type 26 vector vaccine encoding Ebola glycoprotein (Ad26.ZEBOV) and a modified vaccinia Ankara vector vaccine encoding glycoproteins from Ebola virus, Sudan virus, Marburg virus, and Tai Forest virus nucleoprotein (MVA-BN-Filo).

  • JAMA April 19, 2016

    Figure 2: Ebola Glycoprotein-Specific Antibody Responses for Vaccine Recipients in Randomized Groups

    These data, along with those for recipients of Ad26.ZEBOV prime and MVA-BN-Filo boost at 14-day interval and for placebo recipients, are in Table 3 and eFigure 1 in Supplement 2. Day 1 is baseline, the day of first vaccination. For numbers of participants included at each time point, see Table 3. Error bars indicate 95% confidence intervals; Ad26.ZEBOV, adenovirus-type 26 vector vaccine encoding Ebola glycoprotein; MVA-BN-Filo, modified vaccinia Ankara vector vaccine, encoding glycoproteins from Ebola virus, Sudan virus, Marburg virus, and Tai Forest virus nucleoprotein.
  • JAMA April 19, 2016

    Figure 1: Participant Flow Diagram

    Numbers with blood samples at the 1-month visit after each vaccination event are shown. Follow-up at days 180 and 240 was not planned for those who received placebo. Ad26.ZEBOV indicates adenovirus-type 26 vector vaccine encoding Ebola glycoprotein; MVA-BN-Filo, modified vaccinia Ankara vector vaccine, encoding glycoproteins from Ebola virus, Sudan virus, Marburg virus, and Tai Forest virus nucleoprotein.aParticipants could be excluded for >1 reason.bParticipants who did not receive boosts are described in the Results section.
  • Clinical Sequelae of Ebola

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 315(7):647-647. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.0606
  • Plan Needed to Prevent Infectious Disease Spread via Air Travel

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 315(6):549-549. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.0164
  • Lessons From Ebola Outbreak Point to Reforms

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 315(3):242-242. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.18458
  • Global Help for Post-Ebola Recovery in West Africa

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 314(11):1107-1107. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.11110
  • HHS Establishes Training and Education Center for Ebola

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 314(8):761-761. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.9966
  • Rapid US Response to Ebola Threat

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 314(8):763-763. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.9791
  • JAMA June 16, 2015

    Figure 5: 2012-2014 DAH in 2014 US Dollars by the Respective DALY Estimate in 2013 for Each Health Focus Area

    DAH indicates development assistance for health; DALY, disability-adjusted life year; HIV, human immunodeficiency virus. Data for 2013 and 2014 are preliminary estimates. Funding for Ebola has been included with other infectious diseases. Error bars indicate 95% confidence intervals.
  • JAMA June 16, 2015

    Figure 3: Comparing Flows of Development Assistance for Health From the 3 Largest Sources in 2014 US Dollars, Aggregated From 2012-2014

    Abbreviations are defined in the legend for Figure 2. aUN agencies include the UN Children’s Fund, the UN Population Fund, the Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS, the Pan American Health Organization, and the World Health Organization. bDevelopment Banks include the World Bank—International Development Association, the World Bank—International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the Inter-American Development Bank, the African Development Bank, and the Asian Development Bank. cNGOs and foundations include NGOs and US foundations.dFunding for Ebola has been included with other infectious diseases.eOther health focus areas corresponds to DAH for which project-level information are available but which is not identified as funding any of the health focus areas tracked. fUnallocable corresponds to DAH for which project-level information is not available and cannot otherwise be parsed across health focus areas. Data for 2013 and 2014 are preliminary estimates. gPrivate philanthropy includes corporate donations and other private philanthropy.
  • JAMA June 16, 2015

    Figure 2: Flow of Development Assistance for Health From Source to Channel to Health Focus Area in Billions of 2014 US Dollars, 1990-2014

    DAH indicates development assistance for health; HIV, human immunodeficiency virus; NGO, nongovernmental organizations; SWAps/HSS, sector-wide approaches and health system strengthening; UN, United Nations.aPrivate philanthropy includes corporate donations and other private philanthropy. bOther sources includes debt repayments and unallocable funds by source.cUN agencies include the UN Children’s Fund, the UN Population Fund, the Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS, the Pan American Health Organization, and the World Health Organization.dDevelopment Banks include the World Bank—International Development Association, the World Bank—International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the Inter-American Development Bank, the African Development Bank, and the Asian Development Bank. eNGOs and foundations include NGOs and US foundations. fFunding for Ebola has been included with other infectious diseases.gOther health focus areas corresponds to DAH for which project-level information is available but which is not identified as funding any of the health focus areas tracked in this study. hUnallocable corresponds to DAH for which project-level information is not available and cannot otherwise be parsed across health focus areas. Data for 2013 and 2014 are preliminary estimates.
  • Increased Measles Risk Possible in African Countries Affected by Ebola

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 313(19):1897-1897. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.4782
  • Study Reveals Consistent Ebola Virus Mutation Rate Between Outbreaks

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 313(17):1703-1703. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.4095
  • Reforming the World Health Organization After Ebola

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2015; 313(14):1407-1408. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.2334
  • Emergency Postexposure Vaccination With Vesicular Stomatitis Virus–Vectored Ebola Vaccine After Needlestick

    Abstract Full Text
    free access has multimedia
    JAMA. 2015; 313(12):1249-1255. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.1995

    This report summarizes the experience of 1 patient with needlestick exposure to the Ebola virus and postexposure vaccination with VSVΔG-ZEBOV.

  • Emergency Treatment for Exposure to Ebola Virus: The Need to Fast-track Promising Vaccines

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2015; 313(12):1221-1222. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.2057