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  • Dietary Guidelines for Americans—Eat Less Salt

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2016; 316(7):782-782. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.0970
  • Dietary Salt, Kidney Disease, and Cardiovascular Health

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 315(20):2173-2174. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.5985
  • Salt and Sodium Intake in China

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2016; 315(7):703-705. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.15816

    This nutritional epidemiology study compares salt and sodium intake in China in 2000 and in 2009-2012.

  • JAMA September 17, 2014

    Figure: Bingham Mine : Jonas Lie

    Jonas Lie (1880-1940), Bingham Mine, 1917, American. Oil on canvas. 101.6 × 152.4 cm. Courtesy of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, University of Utah (http://umfa.utah.edu/), Salt Lake City; purchased with funds from the Phyllis Cannon Wattis Endowment for Modern and Contemporary Art, from the permanent collection of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts.
  • JAMA June 26, 2013

    Figure: IOM Report: Evidence Fails to Support Guidelines for Dietary Salt Reduction

    A new report finds no evidence that drastic reductions of dietary salt reduce the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, or death.
  • IOM Report: Evidence Fails to Support Guidelines for Dietary Salt Reduction

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 309(24):2535-2536. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.7110
  • JAMA December 14, 2011

    Figure: Study Enrollment and Inclusion in Case-Control Analysis

    Details of the study design, methods, and recruitment have been reported. In brief, recruitment was through 59 hospitals in 5 geographic regions defined by state and county lines that included the State of Rhode Island and Bristol County, Massachusetts; DeKalb County, Georgia; Galveston and Brazoria Counties, Texas; Bexar County, Texas; and Salt Lake County, Utah. Analysis was restricted to participants with a complete or partial maternal interview and chart abstraction. Within this group, comparisons were made overall (all stillbirths compared with all live births) as well as for 2 subgroups (all stillbirths compared with all live births among deliveries at ≥24 weeks' gestation and antepartum stillbirths compared with all live births among deliveries of nonanomalous singletons at ≥24 weeks' gestation). Actual numbers of participants are shown; for weighted sample sizes, see Tables 2 through 5.
  • JAMA November 23, 2011

    Figure 1: Estimated 24-Hour Urinary Excretion of Sodium and Composite of Cardiovascular Death, Stroke, Myocardial Infarction, and Hospitalization for Congestive Heart Failure

    Spline plot for adjusted Cox models. Median intake is reference standard. Salt approximates 2.5 × sodium g per day. Model was adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity (white vs nonwhite); prior history of stroke or myocardial infarction; creatinine, body mass index; comorbid vascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, smoking, low- and high-density lipoprotein); treatment allocation (ramipril, telmisartan, neither, or both); treatment with statins, β-blockers, diuretic therapy, calcium antagonist, and antithrombotic therapy; fruit and vegetable consumption, level of exercise; baseline blood pressure and change in systolic blood pressure from baseline to last follow-up; and urinary potassium. Dashed lines indicate 95% CIs. Events and numbers at risk are shown between values on x-axis because they indicate the numeric range between these values.aSpline curve truncated at 12 g per day (63 participants had sodium excretion >12 g/d, event rate 21/63).
  • JAMA November 23, 2011

    Figure 2: Estimated 24-Hour Urinary Excretion of Sodium and Cardiovascular Death, Myocardial Infarction, Hospitalization for Congestive Heart Failure, and Stroke

    Spline plot for adjusted Cox models. Median intake is reference standard. Salt approximates 2.5 × sodium g per day. Model was adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity (white vs nonwhite); prior history of stroke or myocardial infarction; creatinine, body mass index; comorbid vascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, smoking, low- and high-density lipoprotein); treatment allocation (ramipril, telmisartan, neither, or both); treatment with statins, β-blockers, diuretic therapy, calcium antagonist, and antithrombotic therapy; fruit and vegetable consumption, level of exercise; baseline blood pressure and change in systolic blood pressure from baseline to last follow-up; and urinary potassium. Dashed lines indicate 95% CIs. Events and numbers at risk are shown between values on x-axis because they indicate the numeric range between these values.aSpline curve truncated at 12 g per day (63 participants had sodium excretion >12 g/d; event rate, 8/63 for cardiovascular death and for myocardial infarction, 7/63 for congestive heart failure, and 4/63 for stroke).
  • Protecting Special Interests in the Name of “Good Science”

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2006; 295(20):2407-2410. doi: 10.1001/jama.295.20.2407
  • JAMA June 2, 2004

    Figure: Coupled Transport of Sodium and Glucose in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Although nutrient-independent sodium absorption across the brush border membrane of intestinal epithelial cells is impaired in patients with diarrhea, coupled transport of sodium and glucose is preserved, allowing absorption of salt and water provided by oral rehydration solutions (ORSs). Sodium-glucose transporter type 1 (SGLT1) mediates the transport of glucose against its concentration gradient by coupling it to sodium transport. Sodium that enters the cell is pumped into the blood by the Na+K+ATPase (adenosine triphosphatase) pump in the basolateral membrane, maintaining the sodium electrochemical gradient that drives the sodium-glucose cotransport mechanism. Transport of glucose into the blood is facilitated by glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT2).
  • Claude Lenfant, MD

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2003; 290(8):1017-1018. doi: 10.1001/jama.290.8.1017
  • Miscellanea Medica

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2002; 288(22):2812-2812. doi: 10.1001/jama.288.22.2812-JMN1211-2-2
  • Miscellanea Medica

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2002; 287(6):705-705. doi: 10.1001/jama.287.6.705-JMN0213-4-2
  • Miscellanea Medica

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2001; 286(20):2533-2533. doi: 10.1001/jama.286.20.2533-JMN1128-2-2
  • Miscellanea Medica

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2001; 286(15):1828-1828. doi: 10.1001/jama.286.15.1828-JMN1017-2-2
  • Magazine Ideals Wrong

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2001; 286(4):409-409. doi: 10.1001/jama.286.4.409-JQU10006-3-1
  • Miscellanea Medica

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2000; 284(19):2444-2444. doi: 10.1001/jama.284.19.2444-JMN1115-3-2
  • JAMA July 19, 2000

    Figure 1: Clinical, Histologic, and Immunopathologic Features of Bullous, Gestational, and Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid

    A, Tense blisters situated on inflamed and noninflamed skin along with crusted erosions in a patient with bullous pemphigoid. B, Urticarial plaques rimmed by vesicles, blisters, and erosions in a patient with pemphigoid gestationis. (Reproduced with permission from Yancey KB, Lawley TJ. Herpes gestationis. In: Theirs BH, Dobson RL, eds. Pathogenesis of Skin Disease. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 1986:185.) C, Conjunctival injection and cicatrization in a patient with mucous membrane pemphigoid. D, Light microscopy of lesional skin from a patient with bullous pemphigoid demonstrates a subepidermal blister with fibrin and a leukocytic infiltrate (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification × 40). E, Direct immunofluorescence microscopy of perilesional skin from a patient with bullous pemphigoid demonstrates in situ continuous linear deposits of IgG in the epidermal basement membrane (original magnification × 50). F, Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrates the reactivity of circulating IgG from a patient with bullous pemphigoid against the epidermal side of a 1 molar salt-split skin test substrate (original magnification × 50).
  • MISCELLANEA MEDICA

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2000; 283(17):2227-2227. doi: 10.1001/jama.283.17.2227-JMN0503-3-2