Showing 1 – 20 of 341
Relevance | Newest | Oldest |
  • Screening for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(17):1702-1703. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.15782

    This JAMA Clinical Guidelines Synopsis summarizes the 2017 Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guideline on screening for chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder.

  • JAMA October 3, 2017

    Figure: Association of Combined Inhaler Therapy With Incidence of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Exacerbation

    The other long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMA) + long-acting β-agonists (LABA) indicates tiotropium plus olodaterol, umeclidinium plus vilanterol, tiotropium plus indacaterol, tiotropium plus salmeterol, tiotropium plus formoterol, glycopyrronium plus indacaterol, or aclidinium plus formoterol. In all studies, LABA plus inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) was salmeterol plus fluticasone. A Mantel-Haenszel random-effects model was used. The size of the squares indicates the weight of each study.
  • Long-Acting β-Agonists (LABA) Combined With Long-Acting Muscarinic Antagonists or LABA Combined With Inhaled Corticosteroids for Patients With Stable COPD

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(13):1274-1275. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.11903

    This Clinical Evidence Synopsis summarizes a Cochrane review on the efficacy of long-acting β-agonists (LABAs) combined with long-acting muscarinic antagonists vs LABAs combined with inhaled corticosteroids for patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  • JAMA September 26, 2017

    Figure 1: County-Level Mortality From Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    A, Age-standardized mortality rate for both sexes combined in 2014. B, Relative change in the age-standardized mortality rate for both sexes combined between 1980 and 2014. A and B, The color scale is truncated at approximately the first and 99th percentiles as indicated by the range given in the color scale. C, Age-standardized mortality rate in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2014. The bottom border, middle line, and top border of the boxes indicate the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles, respectively, across all counties; whiskers, the full range across counties; and circles, the national-level rate.
  • JAMA September 26, 2017

    Figure 8: County-Level Mortality From Other Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    “Other chronic respiratory diseases” is defined as the combination of all chronic respiratory diseases except chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, interstitial lung disease and pulmonary sarcoidosis, asthma, asbestosis, coal workers’ pneumoconiosis, silicosis, and other pneumoconiosis. A, Age-standardized mortality rate for both sexes combined in 2014. The color scale is truncated at approximately the first and 99th percentiles as indicated by the range given in the color scale. B, Relative change in the age-standardized mortality rate for both sexes combined between 1980 and 2014. The color scale is truncated at approximately the 99th percentile but not at the first percentile, to avoid combining counties where the mortality rate increased with counties where the mortality rate decreased in the same group. C, Age-standardized mortality rate in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2014. The bottom border, middle line, and top border of the boxes indicate the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles, respectively, across all counties; whiskers, the full range across counties; and circles, the national-level rate.
  • Trends and Patterns of Differences in Chronic Respiratory Disease Mortality Among US Counties, 1980-2014

    Abstract Full Text
    is active quiz
    JAMA. 2017; 318(12):1136-1149. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.11747

    This population epidemiology study estimates county-level patterns in mortality rates for chronic respiratory diseases in the United States from 1980 through 2014.

  • JAMA September 26, 2017

    Figure 3: Subgroup Analyses for an Improved Outcome Assessed by Modified Rankin Scale Score Comparing Oxygen vs Control at 90 Days

    The x-axis depicts the common odds ratio (OR) for a better outcome over all 7 levels of the modified Rankin Scale score (mRS), derived from ordinal logistic regression. ORs greater than 1 indicate that a good outcome (low mRS) is more likely with oxygen than with control (reference category). The size of the markers reflects the total sample size in each subgroup, with larger markers indicating more precise estimates. The subgroup thresholds for oxygen concentration at randomization were revised from the prespecified thresholds because the analysis did not converge using the prespecified values. SSV indicates Six Simple Variable risk score; COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; GCS, Glasgow Coma Scale.
  • JAMA September 12, 2017

    Figure 2: Mortality Outcomes in the Women’s Health Initiative Hormone Therapy Trials During the 18-Year Cumulative Follow-up

    The 18-year follow-up is cumulative, indicating the intervention plus extended postintervention phases of the 2 trials (median, 17.7 [interquartile range {IQR}, 16.6-18.6] years in the conjugated equine estrogens [CEE] plus medroxyprogesterone acetate [MPA] trial; median, 17.7 [IQR, 16.5-18.7] years in the CEE-alone trial; and median,17.7 [IQR,16.6-18.6] years in the pooled analysis).aCardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality includes deaths due to myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, venous thromboembolism, and other major causes of CVD death.bThe P value corresponding with a test of heterogeneity between trial-specific hazard ratios (HRs) was .05 or less; therefore, the pooled estimate and HR (95% CI) are not reported.cIndicates other mortality outcomes that were known but were not due to Alzheimer disease or other dementia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or accident or injury.
  • National Plan for COPD Care

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(24):2475-2475. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.7991
  • Home Noninvasive Ventilation to Reduce Readmissions for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(21):2167-2169. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.5226
  • Effect of Home Noninvasive Ventilation With Oxygen Therapy vs Oxygen Therapy Alone on Hospital Readmission or Death After an Acute COPD Exacerbation: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    is active quiz
    JAMA. 2017; 317(21):2177-2186. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.4451

    This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of home oxygen therapy with vs without home noninvasive ventilation (NIV) on time to readmission or death in patients with persistent hypercapnia after an acute chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation.

  • Increasing Hypoxemia and Dyspnea in Mild Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(10):1072-1073. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.20179

    A man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and worsening dyspnea has pulmonary hypertension by right heart catheterization, a nonocclusive left femoral and popliteal thrombus, and a large mismatch defect on V/Q scan. What would you do next?

  • JAMA February 14, 2017

    Figure 5: Phenome-Wide Association Study Testing if 48-SNP Polygenic Risk Score for WHR Adjusted for BMI Is Associated With a Range of Disease Phenotypes

    Results are standardized to a 1-SD increase in waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index due to polygenic risk score. All estimates were derived in UK Biobank using instrumental variables regression (adjusting for age, sex, and 10 principal components of ancestry). The threshold for significance was P < .0014 (0.05/35 = 0.0014). Size of data markers is inversely proportional to variance of estimate. COPD indicates chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; OR, odds ratio; SNP, single-nucleotide polymorphism.
  • JAMA November 22, 2016

    Figure 4: Meta-analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials on the Association Between Palliative Care and Symptom Burden at 1- to 3-Month Follow-up

    For all trials, the P value for the pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) was .03; τ2, 0.86; and Q, 230.90. For trials at high risk of bias, the P value for the pooled the SMD was .14; τ2, 2.34; and Q, 215.72. For trials at unclear risk of bias, the P value for the pooled SMD was .01; τ2, <0.0001; and Q, 230.90. Sample sizes in the figure are the number of patients analyzed at the specific time points.Error bars represent 95% CIs. The size of the shaded squares indicates study weight. Diamonds represent pooled SMDs and 95% CIs. The vertical dashed line indicates the pooled effect estimate, and the solid vertical line depicts a null effect. CHFQ indicates Chronic Heart Failure Questionnaire; COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; ESAS, Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale; FACT-L LCS, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Lung Cancer Scale; NRS SOB, Numerical Rating Scale Shortness of Breath; POS, Palliative Outcomes Scale; QUAL-E, Quality of Life at the End of Life; and SES, Symptom Experience Scale.aSolid or hematological cancers. bCOPD or other source of dyspnea. cBreast, colon, lung, and gynecological cancers, and lymphoma. dGastrointestinal, lung, genitourinary, and breast cancers. eCancer, COPD, heart failure, interstitial lung disease, motor neuron disease. fNon–small cell lung cancer. gLung, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, breast, and gynecological cancers.
  • JAMA November 22, 2016

    Figure 2: Random-Effects Meta-analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials on the Association Between Palliative Care and Patient Quality of Life at 1- to 3-Month Follow-up

    For all trials, the P value for the pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) was .02; τ2, 0.52; and Q, 268.18. For trials at low risk of bias, the P value for the pooled the SMD was .01; τ2, <0.0001; and Q, 3.36. For trials at high risk of bias, the P value for the pooled SMD was .05; τ2, 1.52; and Q, 233.84. For trials at unclear risk of bias, the P value for the pooled SMD was .31; τ2, 0.01; and Q, 3.00. Sample sizes in the figure are the number of patients analyzed at the specific time points. Error bars represent 95% CIs. The size of the shaded squares indicates study weight. Diamonds represent pooled SMDs and 95% CIs. The vertical dashed line indicates the pooled effect estimate, and the solid vertical line depicts a null effect. SF-36 indicates Short Form-36; EQ5D, EuroQol 5 Dimensions Questionnaire; FACIT-Pal, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Palliative; FACT-L TOI, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Lung Treatment Outcome Index; FACT-G, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy- General; FACIT-Sp, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spirituality; KCCQ, Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire; MLHFQ, Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire; and MQOL-HK, McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire–Hong Kong adaptation.aSolid or hematological cancers. bBrain, gastrointestinal, head-neck, lung, and other cancers. cBreast, colon, lung, and gynecological cancers, and lymphoma. dNot further specified. eBreast cancer.fGastrointestinal, lung, genitourinary, and breast cancers. gCancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, interstitial lung disease, and motor neuron disease. hNon–small cell lung cancer. iLung, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, breast, and gynecological cancers. jBreast, colon, lung, and other cancers. kBreast, colon, lung, and prostate cancers.
  • JAMA November 22, 2016

    Figure 6: Meta-analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials on the Association Between Palliative Care and Survival

    For all trials, the P value for the pooled hazard ratio (HR) was .44; τ2, 0.08; and Q, 24.29. For trials at low risk of bias, the P value for the pooled the HR was .14; τ2, <0.0001; and for Q, <0.0001. For high risk of bias, the P value for the pooled HR was .99; τ2, <0.59; and Q, 7.03. For unclear risk of risk of bias the P value for the pooled HR was .74; τ2, 0.06; and Q, 10.98. Sample sizes in the figure are the number of patients analyzed at the specific time points.Error bars represent 95% CIs. The size of the shaded squares indicates study weight. Diamonds represent pooled HRs and 95% CIs. The vertical dashed line indicates the pooled effect estimate, and the solid vertical line depicts a null effect (ie, HR, 1).aNon–small cell lung cancer. bGastrointestinal, lung, genitourinary, and breast cancers. cCancer, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, end-stage renal disease, stroke, and dementia. dBreast, colon, lung, and other cancers. eGastrointestinal, lung, breast, gynecological, genitourinary, kidney, lymphoma, skin, and other cancers.
  • Association of Clinical Factors and Therapeutic Strategies With Improvements in Survival Following Non–ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction, 2003-2013

    Abstract Full Text
    free access is active quiz
    JAMA. 2016; 316(10):1073-1082. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.10766

    This population epidemiology study uses UK clinical database data to investigate trends in prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and management strategies and their association with trends in mortality among patients with non–ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) between 2003 and 2013.

  • Combination Treatment for COPD

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 315(21):2268-2268. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.6562
  • Effect of Endobronchial Coils vs Usual Care on Exercise Tolerance in Patients With Severe Emphysema: The RENEW Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2016; 315(20):2178-2189. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.6261

    This randomized clinical trial compares the effectiveness and safety of bilateral endobronchial coil treatment vs usual care for improving exercise tolerance among patients with emphysema and severe lung hyperinflation.