Showing 1 – 20 of 9902
Relevance | Newest | Oldest |
  • Associations of Weight Gain From Early to Middle Adulthood With Major Health Outcomes Later in Life

    Abstract Full Text
    is active quiz
    JAMA. 2017; 318(3):255-269. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.7092

    This cohort analysis uses Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study data to examine the association between weight gain in early to middle adulthood and heart disease, cancer, and death later in life.

  • Can Personalized Care Planning Improve Primary Care?

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(1):25-26. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.6953

    This Viewpoint proposes that integration of patient goals, optimization of chronic disease management, and central record-keeping are essential if personalized care planning is to improve primary care and patient outcomes rather than simply burden primary care practices.

  • Association Between Health Plan Exit From Medicaid Managed Care and Quality of Care, 2006-2014

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(24):2524-2531. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.7118

    This study uses Medicaid administrative data to quantify health plan exit from Medicaid managed care between 2006 and 2014 and to evaluate the change in health care quality associated with plan exit.

  • Pill Reminders Don’t Improve Adherence

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(24):2476-2476. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.7588
  • Obstacles to the Adoption of Biosimilars for Chronic Diseases

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(21):2163-2164. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.5202

    This Viewpoint explores why biosimilars for chronic diseases, the largest category of biological therapies, are unlikely to yield cost savings.

  • Vital Directions for Health and Health Care: Priorities From a National Academy of Medicine Initiative

    Abstract Full Text
    free access is active quiz
    JAMA. 2017; 317(14):1461-1470. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.1964

    In this Special Communication, the president of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) and colleagues describe the findings of NAM’s 2016 Vital Directions for Health and Health Care initiative, which convened experts and opinion leaders to identify infrastructure and policy priorities essential to improving health and health care in the United States.

  • How Can the United States Spend Its Health Care Dollars Better?

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(24):2604-2606. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.16739
  • JAMA November 22, 2016

    Figure 2: Random-Effects Meta-analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials on the Association Between Palliative Care and Patient Quality of Life at 1- to 3-Month Follow-up

    For all trials, the P value for the pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) was .02; τ2, 0.52; and Q, 268.18. For trials at low risk of bias, the P value for the pooled the SMD was .01; τ2, <0.0001; and Q, 3.36. For trials at high risk of bias, the P value for the pooled SMD was .05; τ2, 1.52; and Q, 233.84. For trials at unclear risk of bias, the P value for the pooled SMD was .31; τ2, 0.01; and Q, 3.00. Sample sizes in the figure are the number of patients analyzed at the specific time points. Error bars represent 95% CIs. The size of the shaded squares indicates study weight. Diamonds represent pooled SMDs and 95% CIs. The vertical dashed line indicates the pooled effect estimate, and the solid vertical line depicts a null effect. SF-36 indicates Short Form-36; EQ5D, EuroQol 5 Dimensions Questionnaire; FACIT-Pal, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Palliative; FACT-L TOI, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Lung Treatment Outcome Index; FACT-G, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy- General; FACIT-Sp, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spirituality; KCCQ, Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire; MLHFQ, Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire; and MQOL-HK, McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire–Hong Kong adaptation.aSolid or hematological cancers. bBrain, gastrointestinal, head-neck, lung, and other cancers. cBreast, colon, lung, and gynecological cancers, and lymphoma. dNot further specified. eBreast cancer.fGastrointestinal, lung, genitourinary, and breast cancers. gCancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, interstitial lung disease, and motor neuron disease. hNon–small cell lung cancer. iLung, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, breast, and gynecological cancers. jBreast, colon, lung, and other cancers. kBreast, colon, lung, and prostate cancers.
  • JAMA November 22, 2016

    Figure 3: Random-Effects Meta-analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials on the Association Between Palliative Care and Patient Quality of Life at 4- to 6-Month Follow-Up

    For all trials, the P value for the pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) was .12; τ2, 0.04; and Q, 28.51. For trials at high risk of bias, the P value for the pooled the SMD was .07; τ2, <0.06; and Q, 9.15. For trials at low risk of bias, the P value for the pooled SMD was .01; τ2 <0.0001; Q, 3.20. For trials at unclear risk of bias, the P value for the pooled SMD was .41; τ2, 0.05; and Q, 4.86. Sample sizes in the figure are the number of patients analyzed at the specific time points.Error bars represent 95% CIs. The size of the shaded squares indicates study weight. Diamonds represent pooled SMDs and 95% CIs. The vertical dashed line indicates the pooled effect estimate, and the solid vertical line depicts a null effect. EQ-5D indicates EuroQol 5 Dimensions Questionnaire; FACT-G, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General; FACIT-Pal, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Palliative; FACIT-Sp, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spirituality; HIV, human immunodeficiency virus; MOS-HIV, Medical Outcomes Study-HIV scale; KCCQ, Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire; and SF-36, Short Form-36. aBrain, gastrointestinal, head-neck, lung, and other cancers. bBreast, colon, lung, and gynecological cancers, and lymphoma. cBreast cancer. dUpper gastrointestinal cancers.eGastrointestinal, lung, genitourinary, and breast cancers. fProstate cancer. gNot further specified. hLung, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, breast, and gynecological cancers. iBreast, colon, lung, and prostate cancers.
  • Social Determinants of Chronic Disease Get NIH Attention

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(16):1636-1636. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.15480
  • Chronic Disease Prevention: Tobacco Avoidance, Physical Activity, and Nutrition for a Healthy Start

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(16):1645-1646. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.14370

    This Viewpoint from the National Academy of Medicine's 2016 Vital Directions initiative proposes that the most effective way to prevent chronic disease in US adults is to promote policies that limit tobacco access, encourage physical activity, and uphold school nutrition standards among children.

  • Preparing for Better Health and Health Care for an Aging Population

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(16):1643-1644. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.12335

    This Viewpoint from the National Academy of Medicine's 2016 Vital Directions initiative recommends ways to improve the health and health care of older persons, including development of new care delivery models for people with chronic conditions and strengthening of the elder care workforce.

  • Association of Integrated Team-Based Care With Health Care Quality, Utilization, and Cost

    Abstract Full Text
    free access is active quiz
    JAMA. 2016; 316(8):826-834. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.11232

    This cohort study compares patient outcomes, health care utilization, and costs for patients receiving primary care in integrated team-based care (TBC) vs traditional practice management (TPM) practices (usual care).

  • Lifespan Weighed Down by Diet

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 315(21):2269-2270. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.3829

    This Viewpoint discusses the possibility that declines in life expectancy from obesity-related chronic disease could reverse decades-long improvements in mortality trends, and proposes clinical and policy responses.

  • You’ve Got Mail

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 315(21):2275-2276. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.1757
  • Health Care Delivery Innovations That Integrate Care? Yes! But Integrating What?

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 315(11):1109-1110. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.0505

    This Viewpoint discusses the use of bundled payment programs organized around procedures or diseases as a means of addressing the challenges of implementing integrated models of health care delivery.

  • Chronic Conditions in Adults With Cerebral Palsy

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2015; 314(21):2303-2305. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.11025

    This study uses US Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data between 2002 and 2010 to estimate the risk of 8 chronic conditions in adults with cerebral palsy.

  • Outpatient Pharmacy Expenditures for Children With Serious Chronic Illness in California, 2010-2012

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2015; 314(4):405-407. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.7169

    This study analyzed expenditures for outpatient pharmacy products used by publicly insured children with serious chronic illness during 3 years.

  • Nudging Medical Practice Change One Regulation at a Time

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2015; 313(12):1197-1198. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.0546
  • Medicare and Care Coordination: Expanding the Clinician’s Toolbox

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 313(8):797-798. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.18174

    This Viewpoint aims at helping health care professionals understand the components involved with providing non–face-to-face chronic care management (CCM) to Medicare patients.