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  • JAMA August 22, 2017

    Figure: Olaparib Increased Survival in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Metastatic breast cancer responded better to a PARP inhibitor than to standard chemotherapy.
  • JAMA July 11, 2017

    Figure: Overall Survival Among Patients With Metastatic Cancer Assigned to Electronic Patient-Reported Symptom Monitoring During Routine Chemotherapy vs Usual Care

    Crosses indicate censored observations. Enrollment in the patient-reported symptom monitoring group was enriched for a preplanned subgroup with low baseline computer experience as part of a feasibility substudy with a 2:1 randomization ratio in that subgroup (N = 227) and a 1:1 ratio in the computer-experienced subgroup (N = 539), yielding 441 participants in the patient-reported symptom monitoring group, and 325 in the usual care group. With a minimum follow-up of 5.4 years, median follow-up was 6.9 years (interquartile range, 6.5-7.7) for the electronic patient-reported symptom monitoring group and 7 years (interquartile range, 6.6-8.1) for the usual care group.
  • Effect of First-Line Chemotherapy Combined With Cetuximab or Bevacizumab on Overall Survival in Patients With KRAS Wild-Type Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(23):2392-2401. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.7105

    This randomized clinical trial compares the effect of adding bevacizumab vs cetuximab to standard chemotherapy regimens on overall survival among patients with advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type colorectal cancer.

  • Cetuximab or Bevacizumab With First-Line Chemotherapy in Advanced KRAS Wild-Type Colorectal Cancer: No Difference, but Not the Same

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(23):2376-2378. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.6673
  • JAMA June 20, 2017

    Figure 2: Kaplan-Meier Estimates of Overall Survival Among Patients Randomized to Bevacizumab or Cetuximab

    Tick marks on the curves denote the last known follow-up time for patients with no death date reported. The hazard ratio and P value are adjusted for prior adjuvant therapy, prior radiotherapy, protocol chemotherapy, and randomization before and after the amendment restricting eligibility to the KRAS wild-type tumor. Hazard ratio and P value for the RAS analysis are adjusted for prior adjuvant therapy, prior radiotherapy, protocol chemotherapy, and randomization before or after the amendment restricting eligibility to KRAS wild type tumor (KRAS is defined as exon 2 codons 12, 13; exon 4, codons 117, 146; exon 3 codons 59, 61 or NRAS: exon 2 codons 12, 13; exon 3 codons 59, 61; exon 4 codons 117, 146).
  • Association Between Use of a Scalp Cooling Device and Alopecia After Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2017; 317(6):606-614. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.21038

    This cohort study evaluates associations between use of a scalp cooling system and self-assessed hair loss and quality of life among women receiving chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer at US medical centers.

  • Chemotherapy and Hair Loss

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2017; 317(6):656-656. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.21266
  • Effect of a Scalp Cooling Device on Alopecia in Women Undergoing Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer: The SCALP Randomized Clinical Trial

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    JAMA. 2017; 317(6):596-605. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.20939

    This randomized clinical trial evaluates whether a scalp cooling device is effective compared with no cooling for reducing alopecia in women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy.

  • JAMA February 14, 2017

    Figure: Participant Flow Diagram of the SCALP Trial, December 9, 2013, Through September 30, 2016, at the Interim Analysis

    A cycle of chemotherapy is 2 to 3 weeks long depending on the chemotherapy regimen used (defined by regimen in the protocol).aThe population included in the primary efficacy analysis is composed of participants who were randomized and completed at least 1 cycle of chemotherapy.
  • Little White Lies

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(1):27-28. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.11872
  • Effect of Tailored Dose-Dense Chemotherapy vs Standard 3-Weekly Adjuvant Chemotherapy on Recurrence-Free Survival Among Women With High-Risk Early Breast Cancer: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2016; 316(18):1888-1896. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.15865

    This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of tailored dose-dense adjuvant chemotherapy vs standard adjuvant chemotherapy on recurrence-free survival in women with high-risk early breast cancer.

  • JAMA November 8, 2016

    Figure 1: CONSORT Flow Diagram of a Randomized Trial Comparing Tailored Dose-Dense vs Standard Adjuvant Chemotherapy for High-Risk Early Breast Cancer

    CONSORT flow diagram showing the 2003 patients who were included in the intention-to treat analysis. The 2000 patients who received the intervention as randomized (≥1 cycle of chemotherapy; n = 1001 in the tailored dose-dense group and n = 999 in the standard chemotherapy [control] group) were included in the safety population. Information on the number of patients screened for eligibility was not collected and is thus not reported.
  • JAMA November 8, 2016

    Figure 2: Cumulative Incidence Curves of Efficacy End Points in the Intention-to-Treat Population

    Cumulative incidence curves are shown for the end point for breast cancer recurrence–free survival (primary end point) (A), the end point for event-free survival (B), the end point for overall survival (C), and the end point for distant disease–free survival (D) after a median follow-up of 5.3 years (interquartile range, 4.5-6.1 years) in the tailored dose-dense group and the standard chemotherapy (control) group. HR indicates hazard ratio.
  • JAMA October 25, 2016

    Figure: Tumor Gene Testing May Help Guide Breast Cancer Treatment Decisions

    Genetic profiling of breast cancer tumors could help determine whether chemotherapy is required.
  • JAMA May 3, 2016

    Figure 3: Kaplan-Meier Curves of Overall Survival and Progression-Free Survival, According to the Second Randomization

    A, The 136 patients who experienced 112 events randomized to receive chemotherapy survived a median of 16.5 months (95% CI, 14.5-18.5 months) and were followed up a median of 35.9 months (interquartile range [IQR], 24.2-44.1 months). The 133 patients who experienced 109 events randomized to receive chemoradiotherapy survived a median of 15.2 months (95% CI, 13.9-17.3 months) and were followed up a median of 36.7 months (IQR, 25.0-51.3 months). B, The 136 patients who experienced 125 events randomized to receive chemotherapy experienced progression-free survival for a median of 8.4 months (95% CI, 7.8-9.4 months) and were followed a median of 24.0 months (IQR, 22.0-25.6 months). The 133 patients who experienced 122 events randomized to receive chemoradiotherapy experienced progression-free survival for a median of 9.9 months (95% CI, 8.8-10.4 months) and were followed up a median of 46.2 months (IQR, 22.9-51.3 months).
  • Comparison of Site of Death, Health Care Utilization, and Hospital Expenditures for Patients Dying With Cancer in 7 Developed Countries

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2016; 315(3):272-283. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.18603

    This cohort study uses international claims and registry data to describe site of death, health care utilization, and hospital expenditures in the 180-day and 30-day periods before death among elderly patients with cancer in 7 developed countries.

  • Family Perspectives on Aggressive Cancer Care Near the End of Life

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2016; 315(3):284-292. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.18604

    This study assesses associations between measures of aggressive end-of-life care and bereaved family members’ perceptions of the quality of care in Medicare beneficiaries who died of lung or colorectal cancer between 2003 and 2011.

  • Ovarian Suppression With Triptorelin During Adjuvant Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Long-term Ovarian Function, Pregnancies, and Disease-Free Survival: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2015; 314(24):2632-2640. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.17291

    This randomized clinical trial evaluates the effects of ovarian suppression using the luteinizing hormone–releasing hormone analogue triptorelin on long-term ovarian function, pregnancies, and disease-free survival among premenopausal women receiving adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy.

  • Red-Brown Plaques and Papules in a Patient With Breast Cancer

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 314(20):2182-2183. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.10953

    A 55-year-old woman presented with a generalized erythematous maculopapular rash after receiving breast cancer chemotherapy. She was afebrile and had no constitutional symptoms; laboratory evaluation revealed pancytopenia, and a computed tomography scan showed no metastasis. What would you do next?

  • Easing Cancer Chemotherapy Effects

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 314(15):1554-1554. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.13011