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  • JAMA March 1, 2016

    Figure: Trend in Percentage of Married Physicians Whose Spouse Had a Graduate Degree and Those Whose Spouse Was a Physician, 1960-2010

    Source: Authors’ calculations from Public Use Micro Sample of the US Census (1960-2000) and the American Community Survey (ACS; 2010), N = 22 438. Trend lines from linear regression (P value for trends <.001). Decennial estimates were weighted by sampling weights provided by the census and ACS, and 95% confidence intervals accounted for the use of sampling weights and for clustering at the household level.
  • JAMA April 14, 2015

    Figure: Adjusted Number of Data Breaches and Affected Records Between 2010 and 2013 by State and Quartile

    Adjusted values were calculated by dividing the number of breaches and the affected records by 2013 population estimates from the US Census Bureau based on the state in which the breach was reported. The data quartiles are per 100 000 residents. The Figure does not display data for Hawaii, Alaska, or Puerto Rico.
  • Data Breaches of Protected Health Information in the United States

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2015; 313(14):1471-1473. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.2252
  • JAMA March 24, 2015

    Figure 1: Mean Annual Salary for Female and Male Registered Nurses (RNs)

    Salary amounts reflect 2013 dollars and were normalized using the consumer price index. The American Community Survey outcome data were not adjusted due to the limited availability of explanatory variables.aData from the survey is available at http://datawarehouse.hrsa.gov/data/dataDownload/nssrndownload.aspx.bData from the survey is available at http://www.census.gov/acs/www/data_documentation/data_main/.cEstimated from the model described in the text and in Figure 2.
  • JAMA December 10, 2014

    Figure: 2013 Applicants With at Least Self-rated Advanced Proficiency in a Non-English Language in the United States

    The data presented in this figure are from the US Census Bureau. The following categories, which were among the top 25 languages, were excluded: other Indic languages, African languages, other Asian, other Indo-European, other Pacific, and other Slavic. LEP indicates limited English proficiency.aIncludes Cantonese, Mandarin, and other dialects.bRefers to all LEP speakers in the United States; therefore, in 2013, there were 105 applicants with at least advanced proficiency in any non-English language for every 100 000 LEP speakers.cThe US Census Bureau combines both Spanish and Spanish Creole.
  • Finding the Missing Link for Big Biomedical Data

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 311(24):2479-2480. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.4228
  • JAMA November 13, 2013

    Figure 9: Personal Health Care Spending by Age, 2004

    The data for population by age were obtained from the US Census Bureau. For personal health spending by age, we used National Health Expenditure data on total personal health care expenditures by age in 2004 and adjusted to 2011 dollars using the gross domestic product deflator from the Federal Reserve Bank of St Louis.
  • JAMA November 13, 2013

    Figure 7: Health Insurance Coverage Status of the US Population, 1990-2012

    POS indicates point of service; HMO, health maintenance organization; HDHP/SO, high-deductible health plan/savings option; PPO, preferred provider organization. The health insurance coverage status of the US population was estimated based on data obtained from the US Census Bureau and from Jones & Bartlett Learning.aCompound annual growth rate (CAGR) supposing that year A is x and year B is y, CAGR = (y/x){1/(B−A)}−1.
  • JAMA November 13, 2013

    Figure 8: National Health Expenditures (NHEs) by Patient Group, 2011

    The population of each patient group was estimated combining multiple data sources. The population of patients with chronic conditions was calculated based on data obtained from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. People who did not visit medical care providers in 2010 were defined as “well” and the data for this population were obtained from the US Census Bureau. The residual population was defined as having “acute self-limited conditions.” These population data were all adjusted to the 2011 gross US population, which was obtained from the U.S. Census Bureau. Health care spending on patients with chronic conditions was calculated based on the data obtained from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Spending on people in the “well” category was estimated by assuming that their mean expenditure per person is in the lowest 50% bracket, and this spending data was obtained from the National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. The residual was assumed to be spending on population with acute self-limited conditions.aDefined as those who made no visit to medical care providers in 2010.bCalculated as difference between the total and the sum of “well” and “chronic conditions.”
  • JAMA November 13, 2013

    Figure 5: Growth Drivers of Spending on Personal Health Care, 2001-2011

    Factors accounting for growth in personal health care spending were calculated as previously described. The annual growth rate of personal health care spending was calculated based on data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Medical price growth was estimated using the producer and consumer price indexes obtained from the US Department of Labor. The US population data from the US Census Bureau was used to calculate the population growth rate. As a residual, the category of use and intensity includes any errors in measuring prices or total spending.aMedical price growth includes economywide and excess medical-specific price growth. Based on the gross domestic product deflator, the annual economywide price growth during each of the 3 periods was as follows: 2000 to 2004, 2.2%; 2004 to 2008, 2.9%; and 2008 to 2011, 1.4%. The remainder is that of excess medical-specific price growth.bIncludes spending on hospital care, physician and clinical services, dental and other professional services, nursing and continuing care retirement facilities, other health/residential/personal care, home health care, nondurable medical products, durable medical equipment, and prescription drugs.cCompound annual growth rate (CAGR) supposing that year A is x and year B is y, CAGR = (y/x){1/(B−A)}−1.
  • A Census of State Health Care Price Transparency Websites

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2013; 309(23):2437-2438. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.6557
  • Why Are On-the-Job Fatalities So High Among Oil and Gas Industry Workers?

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 309(22):2318-2318. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.6383
  • Some Streets Aren’t Made for Walking

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 309(21):2206-2206. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.6021
  • JAMA May 4, 2011

    Figure 2: CABG Surgery Rates Between 2001 and 2008 By Sex, Race, Age, and US Census Region of CABG Surgery Recipients

    CABG indicates coronary artery bypass graft. The y-axes indicate quarterly procedure rates.
  • Occupational Injuries and Deaths Among Younger Workers—United States, 1998-2007

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2010; 304(1):33-35. doi:
  • JAMA October 28, 2009

    Figure: Ground and Rotary Air Transport Service Areas for US Burn Centers

    Census tracts with very low population density are geographically very large. Inclusion of those tracts makes some of the service area polygons in our analysis highly irregular in shape. This irregularity represents an artifact of variation in census tracts and not misclassification in our analysis. See interactive maps.
  • JAMA October 21, 2009

    Figure 3: Percentage of Active Physicians in Various Age Groups Based on 2020 Projections Derived From the CPS and Masterfile Data

    CPS indicates US Census Bureau Current Population Survey; Masterfile, American Medical Association Physician Masterfile.
  • JAMA October 21, 2009

    Figure 1. Trends in CPS and Masterfile Data Estimates of the Number of Active Physicians Between 1979 and 2008, in Total and by 10-Year Age Groups.

    CPS indicates US Census Bureau Current Population Survey; Masterfile, American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. Each data point represents the number of physicians who were active (working ≥20 hours per week) in a given year, based on data from the Masterfile and CPS. The Masterfile data are based on a census and have no sampling errors. Standard errors on the CPS data estimates for a single year are 4% to 5% for all ages, 13% to 24% for ages ≥65 years, and 8% to 13% for all other age categories. Active physicians includes both medical and osteopathic physicians.
  • JAMA October 21, 2009

    Figure 2: Expected Number of Active Physicians for Each 10-Year Birth Cohort, Born 1905-1914 Through 1974-1983, at Ages 45 to 54 Years by Data Source and Sex

    CPS indicates US Census Bureau Current Population Survey; Masterfile, American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. Estimates are based on the model as described in the “Statistical Analysis” section of the text. Each line plots estimates based on data from a different sample (men, women, and pooled) and data source (Masterfile and CPS). Standard errors on the Masterfile data estimates for each birth cohort are 2% to 5%; on the CPS data, 7% to 12%, except for female cohorts (22%-38%). Estimates for more recent cohorts are inferred from employment at ages 25 to 34 years (when CPS estimates had greater employment than the Masterfile), resulting in higher estimates of cohort size for CPS vs Masterfile post-1970.
  • Comparison of Physician Workforce Estimates and Supply Projections

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2009; 302(15):1674-1680. doi: 10.1001/jama.2009.1461