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  • JAMA September 19, 2017

    Figure: Contributions of Selected Causes of Death to the Change in Life Expectancy in the United States, 2000-2015

    aIn ranked cause-of-death classification, drug, opioid, and alcohol poisoning are not considered to be unique cause-of-death categories. Instead, poisoning deaths are classified as either accidental poisonings (which contribute to unintentional injuries), suicides, or homicides (ranked 16th in leading causes of death). Contributions from drug, opioid, and alcohol poisoning deaths overlap with both unintentional injury deaths and suicides and cannot be summed with these leading ranked causes of death.
  • JAMA January 3, 2017

    Figure 1: Mortality Rate vs Funding and Publication Volume for 30 Leading Causes of Death in the United States

    HIV indicates human immunodeficiency virus. Shaded areas indicate 95% CIs. Plotting is on a log-log scale. Funding represents the total funding awarded over the years 2004 to 2015. Dollar amounts have not been corrected for the year in which they were reported.
  • JAMA January 3, 2017

    Figure 2: Studentized Residual Predicted vs Observed Funding and Publication Volumes for 30 Leading Causes of Death in the United States

    HIV indicates human immunodeficiency virus. Mortality rate was used to predict funding and research volume. Studentized residuals (residual divided by estimated standard error) were calculated to give a standardized estimate of predicted vs observed funding and publication volume. The 4 quadrants represent observed funding greater than predicted, observed publication volume less than predicted (upper-left); observed funding and publication volume greater than predicted (upper-right); observed funding less than predicted, observed publication volume greater than predicted (lower-right); observed funding and publication volume less than predicted (lower-left).
  • Death in the United States: Changes From 1969 to 2013

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2016; 315(3):318-318. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.17432
  • JAMA October 27, 2015

    Figure 2: Age-Standardized Death Rate by Sex and Cause of Death in the United States, 1969-2013.

    COPD indicates chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.Data markers represent observed rates; lines are fitted rates based on joinpoint analysis. Left panels, The blue in the y-axes represents the death rate range from 0 to 500 per 100 000 persons. Right panels, The orange in the y-axes represents the death rate range from 0 to 50 per 100 000 persons.
  • Temporal Trends in Mortality in the United States, 1969-2013

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2015; 314(16):1731-1739. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.12319

    This population epidemiology study uses US National Vital Statistics System data to characterize trends in all-cause and cause-specific mortality between 1969-2013.

  • Premature Birth Complications Top Cause of Death in Children Younger Than 5 Years

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 313(3):235-235. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.18326
  • The State of Health in the United States

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 310(6):585-586. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.13809
  • JAMA August 7, 2013

    Figure: Publications About Firearms and 10 Leading Causes of Death Among Children and Adolescents

    The annual number of firearms publications was 25 in 1991 and 25 in 1992, 43 in 1993, 38 in 1994, 49 in 1995, 49 in 1996, 48 in 1997, 54 in 1998, 61 in 1999, 46 in 2000, 39 in 2001, 61 in 2002, 43 in 2003, 40 in 2004, 54 in 2005, 43 in 2006, 33 in 2007, 31 in 2008, 33 in 2009, and 33 in 2010.
  • JAMA October 24, 2012

    Figure: Flow Diagram of Study Participants

    DNR indicates do not resuscitate; ICU, intensive care unit. aThe 19 medical disorders that were considered unsuitable by the treating physician consisted of 2 patients dependent on home ventilation, 6 patients with metabolic disorders, 2 patients for whom it was the personal opinion of the treating physician that it would be inappropriate to participate in a study in view of poor prognosis (although the patients formally did not have a DNR code), and 9 patients who had already been treated with intensive insulin therapy elsewhere before assessment for participation.bCauses of death are shown in eTable 3. cMore information on the diagnoses of the severely disabled patients who could not be tested is shown in eTable 4.
  • Cancer Now Leading Cause of Death in US Hispanics

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2012; 308(14):1420-1420. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.13354
  • Causes of Death Among Stillbirths

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2011; 306(22):2459-2468. doi: 10.1001/jama.2011.1823
  • JAMA September 22, 2010

    Figure 1: Subclinical Hypothyroidism vs Euthyroidism for Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) Events, CHD Mortality, and Total Mortalitya

    aThe sizes of the data markers are proportional to the inverse variance of the hazard ratios (HRs). CI indicates confidence interval; HUNT, Nord-Trøndelag Health Study; HR, hazard ratio.bForty-six participants from the Whickham survey and 3 participants from the Busselton Health Study were not included because follow-up data were only available for death.cNine participants were excluded from the analysis because of missing cause of death. The Brazilian Thyroid Study was not included in this analysis because of unreliable estimates based on the small number of CHD deaths (n = 10).
  • JAMA September 22, 2010

    Figure 2: Hazard Ratios (HRs) for Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) Events, CHD Mortality, and Total Mortality According to Elevated Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Categories and Subclinical Hypothyroidism Stratified by Age vs Euthyroidisma

    aThe sizes of the filled square data markers are proportional to the inverse variance of the HRs. The unfilled squares indicate the reference categories. For the analyses stratified by age, the HRs for CHD events, CHD mortality, and total mortality were adjusted for sex and age as a continuous variable to avoid residual confounding within age strata. CI indicates confidence interval.bData were available from 7 studies.cData were available from 10 studies. The Brazilian Thyroid Study was not included because of unreliable estimates based on the small number of CHD deaths (n = 10). Nine participants were excluded from the analysis because of missing cause of death.dData were available from 11 studies.
  • JAMA July 14, 2010

    Figure: Cumulative Mortality of Causes of Death Among Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    Observed cumulative mortality of all causes of death other than recurrence was 19.0% at 50 years from initial diagnosis, whereas 6.3% was expected based on rates from the general population. Cumulative mortality of death due to recurrence increased rapidly with time from diagnosis to 8.9% by 15 years but then leveled off to 12.4% by 50 years. Cumulative mortality for each cause of death takes into account other causes of death as a competing risk. For second primary cancer, cumulative mortality increased gradually with time to 2.4% by 30 years but then increased rapidly to 8.6% by 50 years. For circulatory disease, the cumulative mortality was low by 30 years (0.8%) but increased to 3.9% by 50 years. Segment of y-axis shown in blue indicates cumulative mortality range of 0% to 10%. Error bars indicate 95% confidence intervals.
  • JAMA October 21, 2009

    Figure 1: Pedigree Showing Offspring of the Sperm Donor

    In the 2 genetically affected offspring without left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, other clinical evidence of the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype was present, including abnormal electrocardiogram with T-wave inversion in leads II and III, aVF, and Q waves in leads V4 to V6 (IV-3), or mild systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve (IV-6). One offspring (IV-11) died of progressive heart failure due to obstructive HCM and was tested retrospectively on a stored DNA sample extracted from peripheral blood obtained prior to death. Although cardiac evaluation was not available in any of the donor's parents, grandparents, or siblings, the donor reported that he was unaware of any evidence of HCM in these family members. The cause of death in the paternal grandmother (I-2) was reported to be a “heart attack” at age 56 years. Both of the donor's parents underwent prosthetic valve replacement. All offspring with unshaded pedigree symbols had reportedly normal cardiac evaluations. Diamond represents 4 additional offspring who did not participate directly in the study but have not pursued genetic testing and have had ongoing cardiac evaluations that were reportedly normal.
  • JAMA January 28, 2009

    Figure: Reforms Needed in Adolescent Health Care

    Unintentional injury, often tied to risky behaviors, is the leading cause of death in adolescents.
  • Road Deaths

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2007; 297(19):2069-2069. doi: 10.1001/jama.297.19.2069-d
  • JAMA March 21, 2007

    Figure 3: Leading Causes of Death Contributing to the Change in the Black-White Gap in Life Expectancy at Birth Among Males and Females in the United States, 1983-1993 and 1993-2003

    CVD indicates cardiovascular disease; HIV, human immunodeficiency virus; CLRD, chronic lower respiratory disease. Each bar indicates the net contribution of mortality changes in each cause of death to the overall change in the life expectancy gap in years.
  • Trends in the Black-White Life Expectancy Gap in the United States, 1983-2003

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2007; 297(11):1224-1232. doi: 10.1001/jama.297.11.1224