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  • First Biosimilar to Treat Cancer

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(17):1644-1644. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.15839
  • Targeting Immune Checkpoints in Cancer Therapy

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(17):1647-1648. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.14155

    This Viewpoint reviews the development of immune checkpoint inhibitors as a new drug class for treating cancer, and discusses future directions including development of commercial assays for identifying response-to-treatment biomarkers and the use of combination regimens to improve response.

  • Excessive Weight Gain, Obesity, and Cancer: Opportunities for Clinical Intervention

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2017; doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.15519

    This Viewpoint reviews evidence documenting an association between overweight and obesity and cancer and discusses the underacknowledged role of weight control counseling and community programs as a cancer prevention strategy.

  • Cancer DNA in the Circulation: The Liquid Biopsy

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    JAMA. 2017; 318(13):1272-1274. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.12131

    This JAMA Insights article explains cell-free circulating tumor DNA and its utility in noninvasive cancer detection and characterization, prediction of treatment response, monitoring of disease relapse, and identification of mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapies.

  • US to Increase Efforts to Reduce Rural Cancer Toll

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(12):1098-1098. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.13332
  • Going With the Flow: The Promise and Challenge of Liquid Biopsies

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(12):1095-1097. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.10203

    This Medical News article discusses recent advances and challenges in the development of liquid biopsies for cancer management.

  • Breast Cancer Surgery: Less Is More

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(10):909-911. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.12890
  • JAMA September 12, 2017

    Figure 3: Mortality Outcomes During the Intervention Phase According to 10-Year Age Groups at Randomization

    Reported values indicate the duration of follow-up for the intervention phase (median, 5.6 [interquartile range {IQR}, 4.9-6.5] years in the conjugated equine estrogens [CEE] plus medroxyprogesterone acetate [MPA] trial; median, 7.2 [IQR, 6.5-8.2] years in the CEE-alone trial; and median, 6.3 [IQR, 5.3-7.3] years in the pooled analysis). Age groups indicate participant ages at randomization. HR indicates hazard ratio.aP values based on a test for trend of interaction between the randomization group and the age group.bCardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality includes deaths due to myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, venous thromboembolism, and other major causes of CVD death.cIndicates mortality outcomes not due to CVD or cancer.
  • JAMA September 12, 2017

    Figure 4: Mortality Outcomes During the 18-Year Cumulative Follow-Up According to 10-Year Age Groups at Randomization

    The 18-year follow-up is cumulative, indicating the intervention plus extended postintervention phases of the 2 trials (median, 17.7 [interquartile range {IQR}, 16.6-18.6] years in the conjugated equine estrogens [CEE] plus medroxyprogesterone acetate [MPA] trial; median, 17.7 [IQR, 16.5-18.7] years in the CEE-alone trial; and median,17.7 [IQR,16.6-18.6] years in the pooled analysis). HR indicates hazard ratio.aP values based on a test for trend of interaction between the randomization group and the age group.bCardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality includes deaths due to myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, venous thromboembolism, and other major causes of CVD death.cIndicates mortality outcomes not due to CVD or cancer.
  • Mutation Detection in Patients With Advanced Cancer by Universal Sequencing of Cancer-Related Genes in Tumor and Normal DNA vs Guideline-Based Germline Testing

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(9):825-835. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.11137

    This case series of patients with advanced cancer evaluates the proportion and potential clinical implications of inherited variants detected using DNA sequencing of tumor and normal tissue compared with genetic test results based on current guidelines.

  • The Potential and Challenges of Expanded Germline Testing in Clinical Oncology

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(9):801-803. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.11022
  • Cancer Project Speeding Along

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(4):322-322. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.9616
  • Associations of Weight Gain From Early to Middle Adulthood With Major Health Outcomes Later in Life

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    JAMA. 2017; 318(3):255-269. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.7092

    This cohort analysis uses Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study data to examine the association between weight gain in early to middle adulthood and heart disease, cancer, and death later in life.

  • Precision Approach in Cancer Care

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(1):20-20. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.7641
  • JAMA June 20, 2017

    Figure 1: Flow of Patients Through Cancer and Leukemia B Group and Southwest Oncology Group 80405 Trial

    aThe reasons patients with wild-type (wt), indeterminate, or unknown KRAS status were excluded were not captured at the time of exclusion.bAmendment 5 limited trial eligibility to only patients with KRAS wild-type colorectal cancer in November 2008. cThis double-biologic treatment group was dropped from the trial and primary analysis based on amendment 6, which was established September 2009.dThe primary cohort comprises patients whose KRAS wt colorectal cancer was centrally confirmed by the Southwest Oncology Group and who had consented for the use of their specimens.eReasons for ineligibility in the primary cohort were not captured. fForty-nine tumor samples lacked sufficient DNA or analyses were incomplete.
  • Screening for Thyroid Cancer: Updated Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force

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    JAMA. 2017; 317(18):1888-1903. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.0562

    This Evidence Report to support the 2017 update of the US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement on screening for thyroid cancer summarizes evidence about the benefits and harms associated with thyroid cancer screening and treatment of early thyroid cancer in asymptomatic adults.

  • Farewell to a Cancer That Never Was

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(18):1824-1825. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.3969

    This Medical News story follows up on the recent downgrading of a form of thyroid cancer to a noncancerous neoplasm.

  • JAMA April 25, 2017

    Figure 2: Time to Colonoscopy After a Positive FIT and Adjusted Riska of Advanced Adenoma, Any Colorectal Cancer, and Advanced-Stage Colorectal Cancer

    BMI indicates body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared); FIT, fecal immunochemical test; OR, odds ratio. Models for any colorectal cancer include the entire population. Advanced adenoma was defined as adenomas with advanced histology (ie, tubulovillous and villous adenomas). Models for advanced adenoma exclude 2191 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Advanced-stage cancers were defined as stage III (regional lymph node involvement) or stage IV (distant metastasis) according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system or, for those without such staging, as code 3 (disease in the regional lymph nodes), code 4 (regional disease with direct extension and spread to the regional lymph nodes), or code 7 (distant metastasis) according to the 2013 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Coding and Staging Manual. Models for advanced-stage colorectal cancer exclude 14 patients with colorectal cancer of unknown stage. The adjusted advanced-stage colorectal cancer model dropped 244 patients with unknown BMI because no patient with unknown BMI had this outcome. aAdjusted for sex; age; race/ethnicity; BMI; region; FIT screening year; completion of previous FIT screening (ever and in the prior year); and in the year prior to FIT screening, receipt of the flu or pneumonia vaccine, presence of gastrointestinal symptoms (bleeding or blood in stool, unexplained weight loss, abdominal pain, diarrhea, diverticulitis, inflammatory bowel disease, or Lynch syndrome), diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia or diabetes, current smoker, number of primary care visits, and number of days hospitalized.bRates (95% CIs) were per 1000 patients who had a colonoscopy after a positive FIT.
  • Association Between Time to Colonoscopy After a Positive Fecal Test Result and Risk of Colorectal Cancer and Cancer Stage at Diagnosis

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    JAMA. 2017; 317(16):1631-1641. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.3634

    This cohort study evaluates the association between time to colonoscopy after a positive fecal immunochemical test result and risk of colorectal cancer and advanced-stage disease at diagnosis.

  • Trends in Thyroid Cancer Incidence and Mortality in the United States, 1974-2013

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2017; 317(13):1338-1348. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.2719

    This study uses SEER database data to compare thyroid cancer incidence and mortality rates in the United States by cancer type and stage between 1974 and 2013.