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  • Risks of Breast, Ovarian, and Contralateral Breast Cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(23):2402-2416. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.7112

    This cohort study estimates age-specific risks of breast, ovarian, and contralateral breast cancer among carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and evaluates risk modification by family cancer history and location of the mutation within the BRCA gene.

  • Ovarian Stimulation for In Vitro Fertilization and Long-term Risk of Breast Cancer

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    JAMA. 2016; 316(3):300-312. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.9389

    This cohort study uses Netherlands Cancer Registry data to compare the long-term risk of breast cancer among subfertile women treated with ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization (IVF) vs non-IVF treatment between 1980 and 1995.

  • A Systematic Assessment of Benefits and Risks to Guide Breast Cancer Screening Decisions

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    JAMA. 2014; 311(13):1327-1335. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.1398
  • Detection of Breast Cancer With Addition of Annual Screening Ultrasound or a Single Screening MRI to Mammography in Women With Elevated Breast Cancer Risk

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    JAMA. 2012; 307(13):1394-1404. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.388
    In a multicenter, 3-year study involving 2662 women with an elevated (intermediate) risk of breast cancer and dense breast tissue on prior mammographic examinations, Berg and colleagues found that the addition of annual screening ultrasound or a single screening MRI to annual mammography resulted not only in increased detection of incident breast cancers but also in increased false-positive findings.
  • JAMA January 25, 2012

    Figure: Breast Cancer Symposium Highlights Risk, Recurrence, and Research Trials

    Certain factors, such as having certain gene variants, as well as smoking, alcohol consumption, and obesity, are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer.
  • IOM Panel Urges Lifespan Study of Breast Cancer Risk

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2012; 307(1):23-23. doi: 10.1001/jama.2011.1913
  • Moderate Alcohol Consumption During Adult Life, Drinking Patterns, and Breast Cancer Risk

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    JAMA. 2011; 306(17):1884-1890. doi: 10.1001/jama.2011.1590
  • Alcohol and Risk of Breast Cancer

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2011; 306(17):1920-1921. doi: 10.1001/jama.2011.1589
  • Association of Risk-Reducing Surgery in BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation Carriers With Cancer Risk and Mortality

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    JAMA. 2010; 304(9):967-975. doi: 10.1001/jama.2010.1237
  • JAMA April 1, 2009

    Figure: Promising Test Flags BRCA Mutations in Populations of Hispanic Women

    Finding specific mutations in BRCA genes that increase breast cancer risk is like searching for a needle in a haystack. Scientists are seeking less expensive alternatives to full gene sequencing to detect such mutations.
  • Breast Cancer Surveillance Practices Among Women Previously Treated With Chest Radiation for a Childhood Cancer

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    JAMA. 2009; 301(4):404-414. doi: 10.1001/jama.2008.1039
  • Combined Screening With Ultrasound and Mammography vs Mammography Alone in Women at Elevated Risk of Breast Cancer

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    JAMA. 2008; 299(18):2151-2163. doi: 10.1001/jama.299.18.2151
  • Variation of Breast Cancer Risk Among BRCA1/2 Carriers

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    JAMA. 2008; 299(2):194-201. doi: 10.1001/jama.2007.55-a
  • JAMA January 9, 2008

    Figure: Cumulative Breast Cancer Incidence in Relatives of Probands

    The graphs show the estimated cumulative risks of breast cancer in first-degree female relatives of different categories of proband. The benchmark is the cumulative risk of breast cancer reported by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries (see text).
  • Reducing Breast Cancer Risk

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2007; 297(11):1182-1182. doi: 10.1001/jama.297.11.1182-d
  • Spectrum of Mutations in BRCA1 , BRCA2 , CHEK2 , and TP53 in Families at High Risk of Breast Cancer

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    JAMA. 2006; 295(12):1379-1388. doi: 10.1001/jama.295.12.1379
  • Dietary Modification and Risk of Breast Cancer

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2006; 295(6):691-692. doi: 10.1001/jama.295.6.691
  • Pregnancy Characteristics and Maternal Risk of Breast Cancer

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    JAMA. 2005; 294(19):2474-2480. doi: 10.1001/jama.294.19.2474
  • JAMA January 12, 2005

    Figure 1: Breast Cancer Risk by Quintiles of Total Vegetable Intake by Country

    Adjusted variables are listed in the footnote in Table 4. Greece and Norway were excluded because of the small number of cases accruing there from a short follow-up period.*Not adjusted for current use of hormone therapy because data are not available.
  • JAMA January 12, 2005

    Figure 2: Breast Cancer Risk by Quintiles of Total Fruit Intake by Country

    Adjusted variables are listed in the footnote in Table 4. Greece and Norway were excluded because of the small number of cases accuring there from a short follow-up period.*Not adjusted for current use of hormone therapy because data are not available.