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  • Prevalence of Concussion Among US Adolescents and Correlated Factors

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(12):1180-1182. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.9087

    This study uses a national survey of US adolescents to examine the prevalence and correlates of self-reported diagnosed concussions to target and monitor prevention efforts.

  • Clinicopathological Evaluation of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in Players of American Football

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    JAMA. 2017; 318(4):360-370. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.8334

    This case series investigated the neuropathological and clinical features of deceased football players with chronic traumatic encephalopathy whose brains were donated for research.

  • Assessment of Head Collision Events During the 2014 FIFA World Cup Tournament

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(24):2548-2549. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.6204

    This study uses video footage observations of all 64 matches of the 2014 FIFA World Cup to assess the incidence, characteristics, and sideline outcome assessments of player head collisions.

  • Association Between Early Participation in Physical Activity Following Acute Concussion and Persistent Postconcussive Symptoms in Children and Adolescents

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    JAMA. 2016; 316(23):2504-2514. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.17396

    This cohort study compares the associations between physical activity vs rest within 7 days of acute concussion and postconcussive symptoms at day 28 among Canadian children and adolescents.

  • JAMA December 20, 2016

    Figure 1: Flow Diagram of Participants With and Without Early Physical Activity Following Acute Concussion

    ED indicates emergency department; RA, research assistant.aIncludes those for whom reason was not specified or was missing data due to the fact that 1 of the 9 research ethics boards did not permit the collection of reasons for meeting exclusion criteria due to provincial regulations.
  • Physical Activity or Rest After Concussion in Youth: Questions About Timing and Potential Benefit

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(23):2491-2492. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.17562
  • Evaluating Patients for Concussion

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(13):1350-1350. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.13803
  • It’s Time to Change the Rules

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(12):1260-1261. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.8184
  • Clinical Risk Score for Persistent Postconcussion Symptoms Among Children With Acute Concussion in the ED

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    JAMA. 2016; 315(10):1014-1025. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.1203

    This multicenter cohort study describes a novel clinical risk score developed among children presenting to the emergency department with concussion and head injury within the previous 48 hours to stratify risk of persistent postconcussion symptoms at 28 days.

  • Use of Clinical Prediction Rules for Guiding Use of Computed Tomography in Adults With Head Trauma

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    JAMA. 2015; 314(24):2629-2631. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.17298
  • Eliminating the Confusion Surrounding Concussions in Sports

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 314(13):1388-1389. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.12329

    This commentary describes the difficulties in studying concussion injury with regards to a study published in JAMA Pediatrics involving data for football players at the youth league, high school, and collegiate levels.

  • Concussion and Female Middle School Athletes

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 312(7):739-740. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.6668
  • Relationship of Collegiate Football Experience and Concussion With Hippocampal Volume and Cognitive Outcomes

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    JAMA. 2014; 311(18):1883-1888. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.3313

    Singh and coauthors conducted a cross-sectional study among collegiate football players with and without history of concussion and healthy controls to assess the relationships of concussion history and years of football experience with hippocampal volume and cognitive performance in collegiate football athletes.

  • JAMA May 14, 2014

    Figure 2: Years of Football Experience Inversely Correlate With Baseline Reaction Time and Left Hemisphere Hippocampal Volume

    Left, total number of years that athletes reported having played football (x-axis) in relation to the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing composite reaction time score. Forty-four collegiate football players contributed data (n=22 athletes without and n=22 athletes with concussion); the regression line (blue diagonal line) is calculated for all points regardless of concussion history. Right, relationship between years played and left hemisphere hippocampal volume. Forty-eight athletes contributed data for this plot (n=24 athletes without and n=24 athletes with concussion); the regression line (blue diagonal line) is calculated for all points regardless of concussion history. In both graphs, some data markers overlap.
  • JAMA May 14, 2014

    Figure 1: Smaller Hippocampal Volumes in Collegiate Football Athletes Relative to Healthy Controls

    Total, left hemisphere, and right hemisphere hippocampal volumes for healthy controls (n=25), athletes with no history of concussion (n=25), and athletes with a history of concussion (n=25). Shown in each box plot are the 5th and 95th percentiles (black dots), 10th and 90th percentiles (whiskers), and 25th and 75th percentiles (box top and bottom). The median (solid line) and mean (dotted line) are also shown within each group’s box. Individual volumes for each group are indicated by the symbols to the left of each group’s box plot.
  • Sports-Related Concussions in Youth: Report From the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 311(3):239-240. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.282985
  • Guideline: Tailor Appraisal of Concussion During Sports

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    JAMA. 2013; 309(15):1577-1577. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.3980
  • White Matter Integrity in the Brains of Professional Soccer Players Without a Symptomatic Concussion

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    JAMA. 2012; 308(18):1859-1861. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.13735
  • Diagnosis and Management of Sports-Related Concussion: A 15-Year-Old Athlete With a Concussion

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    JAMA. 2011; 306(1):79-86. doi: 10.1001/jama.2011.819
  • Concussion

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2011; 306(1):114-114. doi: 10.1001/jama.306.1.114