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  • Despite My Best Intentions

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(17):1653-1654. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.6123
  • Better

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(15):1441-1442. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.13537
  • Effect of Individualized vs Standard Blood Pressure Management Strategies on Postoperative Organ Dysfunction Among High-Risk Patients Undergoing Major Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    JAMA. 2017; 318(14):1346-1357. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.14172

    This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of an individualized blood pressure management strategy vs standard blood pressure management strategy on postoperative organ dysfunction among high-risk patients undergoing major surgery.

  • Improving Blood Pressure Control and Health Systems With Community Health Workers

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(11):1009-1011. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.11464
  • Medical Students Fall Short on Blood Pressure Check Challenge

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(11):991-992. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.11255

    This Medical News article discusses the importance of correctly prepping patients for blood pressure measurement.

  • Checking Blood Pressure at Home

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2017; 318(3):310-310. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.6670
  • JAMA June 20, 2017

    Figure 1: Analytic Framework

    Evidence reviews for the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) use an analytic framework to visually display the key questions that the review will address to allow the USPSTF to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a preventive service. The questions are depicted by linkages that relate interventions and outcomes. The dashed line indicates a relationship between an intermediate outcome and a health outcome that is presumed to describe the natural progression of the disease. Refer to USPSTF Procedure Manual for further details. BMI indicates body mass index; CV, cardiovascular; KQ, key question; QOL, quality of life.aBlood pressure, lipid levels, and insulin resistance are secondary outcomes when reported with weight.bIncludes academic, social, or physical functioning.
  • Screening for Preeclampsia: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

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    JAMA. 2017; 317(16):1661-1667. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.3439

    This Recommendation Statement from the US Preventive Services Task Force concludes that pregnant women should be screened for preeclampsia using blood pressure measurements throughout pregnancy.

  • Screening for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults: Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force

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    JAMA. 2017; 317(4):415-433. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.19635

    This Evidence Report to support a 2016 US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement summarizes evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for obstructive sleep apnea in asymptomatic adults.

  • Highest Blood Pressure Levels Shift From Rich to Poor Countries

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 317(3):246-246. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.20449
  • Global Burden of Hypertension and Systolic Blood Pressure of at Least 110 to 115 mm Hg, 1990-2015

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    JAMA. 2017; 317(2):165-182. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.19043

    This population epidemiology study uses pooled global health evaluation surveys data to estimate trends in the association between elevated stystolic blood pressure and death and disability between 1990 and 2015.

  • JAMA September 27, 2016

    Figure 3: Airway Pressure and Arterial Pressure During Controlled Ventilation

    Airway pressure and blood pressure tracings illustrating variations in pulse pressure (PP) during pulse pressure variation (PPV). PPV = (PPmax-PPmin/[(PPmax+PPmin)/2])*100.
  • SPRINT Results in Older Patients: How Low to Go?

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 315(24):2669-2670. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.7070
  • JAMA December 1, 2015

    Figure 4: Longitudinal Changes in Blood Pressure and Heart Rate

    Data displayed as mean (SD) comparing the 10-mg vericiguat group with the placebo group.
  • CPAP vs Mandibular Advancement Devices and Blood Pressure in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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    JAMA. 2015; 314(21):2280-2293. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.16303

    This meta-analysis of trials comparing treatments for obstructive sleep apnea investigates associations between continuous positive airway pressure vs mandibular advancement devices and change in blood pressure.

  • JAMA December 1, 2015

    Figure 1: Flow of Patients Through the Trial

    NT-proBNP indicates N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide; BNP, B-type natriuretic peptide; BP, blood pressure; LVEF, left ventricular ejection fraction; eGFR, estimated glomerular filtration rate.aOne patient in the 2.5-mg vericiguat group was too old according to local regulation (initial age limit <75 y, later suspended).bMajor reasons for exclusion. Each patient may have >1 reason for exclusion.
  • J-Shaped Curves and Public Health

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    JAMA. 2015; 314(13):1339-1340. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.9566

    This Viewpoint discusses approaches to public health communication challenges posed by J-shaped associations between health effects and major modifiable risk factors.

  • JAMA September 1, 2015

    Figure 2: Estimated Yearly Risk of Recurrent ICH Based on Mean Blood Pressure Measurements During Follow-up

    Box upper and lower margins indicate 25th and 75th percentiles of risk distributions, respectively; heavy horizontal lines in boxes indicate median risk values; error bars indicate maximum and minimum estimated risk values in each distribution. Vertical lines in blue indicate currently recommended blood pressure (BP) control goals among survivors of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) without diabetes, based on American Heart Association/American Stroke Association guidelines for post-ICH secondary prevention (lines are added for illustrative purposes only and have no direct impact on risk estimation results). A, Estimated yearly risk of recurrent lobar ICH based on systolic and diastolic BP measurements during follow-up. Estimated risk calculated adjusting for other factors associated with recurrence of lobar ICH (see main text and eMethods in the Supplement). B, Estimated yearly risk of recurrent nonlobar ICH based on systolic and diastolic BP measurements during follow-up. Risk is calculated assuming mean systolic and diastolic BP measurements as indicated on the horizontal axes and is expressed as % recurrent rate/y among survivors of nonlobar ICH. Estimated risk calculated adjusting for other factors associated with recurrence of nonlobar ICH (see main text and eTable 2 in the Supplement).
  • JAMA September 1, 2015

    Figure 1: Participant Enrollment and Sequential Application of Eligibility and Exclusion Criteria Leading to Definition of Final Study Population

    BP indicates blood pressure; CT, computed tomography; EMR, electronic medical records; ICH, intracerebral hemorrhage.