0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
ARTICLE |

Preventable Hospitalizations and Access to Health Care

Andrew B. Bindman, MD; Kevin Grumbach, MD; Dennis Osmond, PhD; Miriam Komaromy, MD; Karen Vranizan, MA; Nicole Lurie, MD, MSPH; John Billings, JD; Anita Stewart, PhD
JAMA. 1995;274(4):305-311. doi:10.1001/jama.1995.03530040033037.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Objective.  —To examine whether the higher hospital admission rates for chronic medical conditions such as asthma, hypertension, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diabetes in low-income communities resulted from community differences in access to care, prevalence of the diseases, propensity to seek care, or physician admitting style.

Design.  —Analysis of California hospital discharge data. We calculated the hospitalization rates for these five chronic conditions for the 250 ZIP code clusters that define urban California. We performed a random-digit telephone survey among adults residing in a random sample of 41 of these urban ZIP code clusters stratified by admission rates and a mailed survey of generalist and emergency physicians who practiced in the same 41 areas.

Setting.  —Community based.

Participants.  —A total of 6674 English- and Spanish-speaking adults aged 18 through 64 years residing in the 41 areas were asked about their access to care, their chronic medical conditions, and their propensity to seek health care. Physician admitting style was measured with written clinical vignettes among 723 generalist and emergency physicians practicing in the same communities.

Main Outcome Measures.  —We compared respondents' reports of access to medical care in an area with the area's cumulative admission rate for these five chronic conditions. We then tested whether access to medical care remained independently associated with preventable hospitalization rates after controlling for the prevalence of the conditions, health care seeking, and physician practice style.

Results.  —Access to care was inversely associated with the hospitalization rates for the five chronic medical conditions (R2=0.50; P<.001). In a multivariate analysis that included a measure of access, the prevalence of conditions, health care seeking, and physician practice style to predict cumulative hospitalization rates for chronic medical conditions, both self-rated access to care (P<.002) and the prevalence of the conditions (P<.03) remained independent predictors.

Conclusion.  —Communities where people perceive poor access to medical care have higher rates of hospitalization for chronic diseases. Improving access to care is more likely than changing patients' propensity to seek health care or eliminating variation in physician practice style to reduce hospitalization rates for chronic conditions.(JAMA. 1995;274:305-311)

Topics

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

Figures

Tables

References

CME
Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Jobs
brightcove.createExperiences();