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From the JAMA Network |

Metformin as Initial Oral Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes

Rachel J. Stern, MD1; Elizabeth J. Murphy, MD, DPhil2,3
[+] Author Affiliations
1San Francisco General Hospital Primary Care Residency, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
2Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
3Division of Endocrinology, San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, California
JAMA. 2015;313(24):2484-2485. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.2765.
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JAMA Internal Medicine

Initial Choice of Oral Glucose-Lowering Medication for Diabetes Mellitus: A Patient-Centered Comparative Effectiveness Study

Seth A. Berkowitz, MD, MPH; Alexis A. Krumme, MS; Jerry Avorn, MD; Troyen Brennan, MD, MPH, JD; Olga S. Matlin, PhD; Claire M. Spettell, PhD; Edmund J. Pezalla, MD, MPH; Gregory Brill, MS; William H. Shrank, MD, MSHS; Niteesh K. Choudhry, MD, PhD

Importance Although many classes of oral glucose-lowering medications have been approved for use, little comparative effectiveness evidence exists to guide initial selection of therapy for diabetes mellitus.

Objective To determine the effect of initial oral glucose-lowering agent class on subsequent need for treatment intensification and 4 short-term adverse clinical events.

Design, Setting, and Participants This study was a retrospective cohort study of patients who were fully insured members of Aetna (a large national health insurer) who had been prescribed an oral glucose-lowering medication from July 1, 2009, through June 30, 2013. Individuals newly prescribed an oral glucose-lowering agent who filled a second prescription for a medication in the same class and with a dosage at or above the World Health Organization’s defined daily dose within 90 days of the end-of-day’s supply of the first prescription were studied. Individuals with interim prescriptions for other oral glucose-lowering medications were excluded.

Exposures Initiation of treatment with metformin, a sulfonylurea, a thiazolidinedione, or a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor.

Main Outcomes and Measures Time to addition of a second oral agent or insulin, each component separately, hypoglycemia, other diabetes-related emergency department visits, and cardiovascular events.

Results A total of 15 516 patients met the inclusion criteria, of whom 8964 (57.8%) started therapy with metformin. In unadjusted analyses, use of medications other than metformin was significantly associated with an increased risk of adding a second oral agent only, insulin only, and a second agent or insulin (P < .001 for all). In propensity score and multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models, initiation of therapy with sulfonylureas (hazard ratio [HR], 1.68; 95% CI, 1.57-1.79), thiazolidinediones (HR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.43-1.80), and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (HR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.47-1.79) was associated with an increased hazard of intensification. Alternatives to metformin were not associated with a reduced risk of hypoglycemia, emergency department visits, or cardiovascular events.

Conclusions and Relevance Despite guidelines, only 57.8% of individuals began diabetes treatment with metformin. Beginning treatment with metformin was associated with reduced subsequent treatment intensification, without differences in rates of hypoglycemia or other adverse clinical events. These findings have significant implications for quality of life and medication costs.

JAMA Intern Med. 2014;174(12):1955-1962. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.5294

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