0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
This Week in JAMA |

This Week in JAMA FREE

JAMA. 2007;298(19):2231. doi:10.1001/jama.298.19.2231.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

RAPID RESPONSE TEAMS IN PEDIATRIC HOSPITALS

Some data suggest that among adult inpatients, rapid response teams (RRTs) reduce the rates of mortality and cardiopulmonary arrest outside the intensive care unit (ICU), but whether RRTs offer benefits for pediatric inpatients is not clear. Sharek and colleaguesArticle determined hospital-wide mortality rates and code rates outside the ICU before and after implementation of an RRT at an academic children's hospital. The authors found that compared with the 56 months before implementation, in the 15 months after RRT implementation, the mean monthly mortality rate decreased 18% and the mean monthly code rate decreased 72%. In an editorial, Nowak and BrilliArticle discuss current data on pediatric RRTs and directions for future investigation.

OBESITY, HEMODILUTION, AND PSA LEVELS

Recent studies have found that obese men have lower circulating levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) than nonobese men. In a large retrospective cohort study of men who had radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer, Bañez and colleagues assessed whether a larger plasma volume in men with higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with lower PSA concentrations. The authors found that men with higher BMI had higher plasma volume and lower PSA concentrations, suggesting a hemodilution effect.

EMPLOYERS' USE OF VALUE-BASED PURCHASING

Value-based purchasing, which includes quality measurement, reporting, and pay-for-performance, has been portrayed as a key element in health system improvement. In a survey of employers from 41 randomly selected and nationally representative health care markets, Rosenthal and colleagues examined the degree to which value-based purchasing and related strategies are used in decisions about employer-sponsored health benefits. The authors found that a majority of employers examined health plan quality data. However, few examined data on physician quality, shared plan, or physician data with employees or offered pay-for-performance rewards to health plan physicians.

POSTTHERAPY PET AND CERVICAL CANCER SURVIVAL

Positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) can be used to assess tumor cell glucose uptake—a reflection of viable tumor cell volume and response to therapy—and is recommended in the pretreatment and posttherapy evaluation of several cancers. In a prospective study of 92 women with cervical cancer who were treated with chemoradiation therapy, Schwarz and colleagues validated a previous finding that FDG uptake on PET 3 months after completion of treatment predicts survival. The authors report that among women with FDG-PET results suggesting a complete or partial treatment response or progressive disease, 3-year progression-free survival was 78%, 33%, and 0%, respectively.

Graphic Jump LocationImage not available.

PET Images: Perry W. Grigsby, MD/Washington University

CLINICIAN'S CORNER

In a systematic literature review to assess the association of pedometer use with physical activity and health outcomes among adults, Bravata and colleagues found that pedometer use—particularly with a daily step goal—was associated with significant increases in physical activity and significant decreases in body mass index and blood pressure.

A PIECE OF MY MIND

“These patients constantly told me that they envisioned psychiatrists to be, well, older and, preferably, bearded.” From “Perceptions.”

MEDICAL NEWS & PERSPECTIVES

Studies suggest deep brain stimulation may help patients with certain types of refractory mental illness and improve function in select individuals in a minimally conscious state.

COMMENTARIES

Radiofrequency identification technology in health care

Reimbursement consequences

AUTHOR IN THE ROOM TELECONFERENCE

Join Dena Bravata, MD, December 19 from 2 to 3 PM eastern time to discuss use of pedometers to increase physical activity. To register, go to http://www.ihi.org/AuthorintheRoom.

AUDIO COMMENTARY

Dr DeAngelis summarizes and comments on this week's issue. Go to http://jama.ama-assn.org/misc/audiocommentary.dtl.

READERS RESPOND

How would you manage a 93-year-old man with advanced dementia and eating problems? Go to www.jama.com, read the case, and submit your response. Your response may be selected for online publication. Submission deadline is November 28.

JAMA PATIENT PAGE

For your patients: Information about carcinoma of the cervix.

Figures

Graphic Jump LocationImage not available.

PET Images: Perry W. Grigsby, MD/Washington University

Tables

References

CME
Also Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
Please click the checkbox indicating that you have read the full article in order to submit your answers.
Your answers have been saved for later.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.