0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
Medical News & Perspectives |

Anatomy Exhibit Shows Charm of Grotesque

Brian Vastag
JAMA. 2002;288(20):2525-2529. doi:10.1001/jama.288.20.2525.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

Bethesda, Md—A body floats waist-high, sliced into dozens of transparent cross-sections to reveal inner geography plane by plane, skull to toe. Painted onto thick plastic sheets hanging parallel, the hovering figure ripples to life with a breeze or a touch, compressing and expanding in waves.

To craft "Suspended Self Portrait," the first piece encountered at the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) new exhibit on the art of anatomy, artist Carolyn Henne climbed into a tub of plaster, molded herself, and sliced the resulting figure 89 times. She filled the sections with painted bone, muscle, fat, organ tissue, and skin, as appropriate, drawing on information from the library's Visible Human project.

Figures in this Article

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Figures

Place holder to copy figure label and caption

Like a segmented mummy, "Suspended Self Portrait" (left) welcomes visitors to the National Library of Medicine's new exhibit, "Dream Anatomy." A detail of the portrait's legs (right) shows bone (white), marrow (pink), muscle (red), and adipose tissue (yellow). Carolyn Henne, artist. (Photo credits: Carolyn Henne, left, and Brian Vastag, right)

Graphic Jump Location
Place holder to copy figure label and caption

La dissection des parties du corps humain . . . , a 1546 French woodcut, exemplifies an early modern era of anatomy in which the boundary between art and science was ill-defined. Anatomical renderings from this period often display cadavers in whimsical poses superimposed on classical backdrops. Charles Estienne, author. Étienne de la Rivière, anatomist. (Photo credit: National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health)

Graphic Jump Location
Place holder to copy figure label and caption

In the late 18th century, the fanciful style of earlier anatomists gave way to a gritty realism. In "The Anatomy of the Gravid Human Uterus," a 1774 English copper-plate engraving, the dissection of the cadaver of a woman who died late in pregnancy is rendered in fine, gruesome detail. William Hunter, anatomist. Jan van Riemsdyk, artist. (Photo credit: National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health)

Graphic Jump Location
Place holder to copy figure label and caption

The early 19th century saw the rise of a new realism in which anatomists and artists sought to communicate the growing body of anatomical knowledge using vivid, hyperrealistic colors. This Italian hand-colored copper-plate engraving is one of several on display from the masterwork "Anatomia Universale" (1833). Pablo Mascagni, anatomist. Antonio Serantoni, artist. (Photo credit: National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health)

Graphic Jump Location

Tables

References

CME
Also Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
Your answers have been saved for later.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Articles Related By Topic
Related Collections
Jobs
brightcove.createExperiences();