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Continuing Medical Education |

June 5, 2002 FREE

JAMA. 2002;287(21):2875-2876. doi:10.1001/jama.287.21.2875.
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Physicians in the United States, Canada, and Mexico

Physicians with current and valid licenses in the United States, Canada, or Mexico who read any 3 of the selected continuing medical education (CME) articles in this issue of JAMA, complete the CME Evaluation Form, and fax it to the number or mail it to the address at the bottom of the CME Evaluation Form are eligible for category 1 CME credit. There is no charge.

The American Medical Association (AMA) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to sponsor CME for physicians. The AMA designates this educational activity for up to 1 hour of category 1 CME credit per JAMA issue toward the AMA Physician's Recognition Award (PRA). Each physician should claim for credit only those hours that were actually spent in this educational activity.

Physicians in Other Countries

Physicians with current and valid licenses in the United States, Mexico, or Canada are eligible for CME credit even if they live or practice in other countries. Physicians licensed in other countries are also welcome to participate in this CME activity. However, the PRA is available only to physicians licensed in the United States, Canada, or Mexico.

Earning Credit and the CME Evaluation Form

To earn credit, read 3 of the articles listed below that are designated for CME credit carefully and complete the CME Evaluation Form. The CME Evaluation Form must be submitted within 1 month of the issue date. A certificate awarding 1 hour of category 1 CME credit will be faxed or mailed to you; it is then your responsibility to maintain a record of credit received.

Statement of Educational Purpose

JAMA is a general medical journal. Its mission and educational purpose is to promote the science and art of medicine and the betterment of the public health. A flexible curriculum of article topics is developed annually by THE JOURNAL's editorial board and is then supplemented throughout the year with information gained from readers, authors, reviewers, and editors. To accommodate the diversity of practice types within JAMA's readership, the Reader's Choice CME activity allows readers, as adult learners, to determine their own educational needs and to assist the editors in addressing their needs in future issues.

Readers of JAMA should be able to attain the following educational objectives: (1) select and read at least 3 articles in 1 issue to gain new medical information on topics of particular interest to them as physicians, (2) assess the articles' value to them as practicing physicians, and (3) think carefully about how this new information may influence their own practices. The educational objective for each CME article is given after the article title below.

CME Hiatus: CME will be suspended between July and December 2002. Beginning in early 2003, we will offer CME online. We apologize for the interruption.

CME Articles in This Issue of
CME Articles in This Issue of JAMA

Effects of Editorial Peer Review: A Systematic ReviewArticle

CME Articles in This Issue of JAMA

Education Objective: To review the evidence that editorial peer review improves the quality of published studies.

CME Articles in This Issue of JAMA

Discussion Sections in Reports of Controlled Trials Published in General Medical JournalsArticle

CME Articles in This Issue of JAMA

Educational Objective: To learn that authors may seldom discuss the results of trials in the context of systematic reviews of relevant research.

CME Articles in This Issue of JAMA

Publication Bias in Editorial Decision MakingArticle

CME Articles in This Issue of JAMA

Educational Objective: To learn that medical journals may not be more likely to publish manuscripts with positive results than manuscripts with results that are negative.

CME Articles in This Issue of JAMA

Postpublication Criticism and the Shaping of Clinical KnowledgeArticle

CME Articles in This Issue of JAMA

Educational Objective: To learn that criticism raised in letters to the editor about published studies may seldom be acknowledged or responded to in clinical practice guidelines.

CME Articles in This Issue of JAMA

Comparison of Review Articles Published in Peer-Reviewed and Throwaway JournalsArticle

CME Articles in This Issue of JAMA

Educational Objective: To learn that review articles published in "throwaway" journals may be deficient in methodologic and reporting quality, but may be easier to read.

CME Articles in This Issue of JAMA

Media Coverage of Scientific Meetings: Too Much, Too Soon?Article

CME Articles in This Issue of JAMA

Educational Objective: To learn that many studies that are presented at scientific meetings and receive news media coverage are not subsequently published in scientific journals.

CME Articles in This Issue of JAMA

Qualitative and Quantitative Measures of Indexed Health Sciences Electronic JournalsArticle

CME Articles in This Issue of JAMA

Educational Objective: To learn that electronic health sciences journals without print counterparts may not have the qualitative or quantitative complexity of traditional print journals.

CME Articles in This Issue of JAMA

After reading 3 of these articles, complete the CME Evaluation Form.

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Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
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The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
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