0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
From the JAMA Network |

Diabetes Overtreatment in Elderly Individuals Risky Business in Need of Better Management

Mary A. Andrews, MD1,2; Patrick G. O’Malley, MD, MPH1,2
[+] Author Affiliations
1Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland
2Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland
JAMA. 2014;311(22):2326-2327. doi:10.1001/jama.2014.4563.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

JAMA Internal Medicine

Assessing Potential Glycemic Overtreatment in Persons at Hypoglycemic Risk

Chin-Lin Tseng, DrPH; Orysya Soroka, MS; Miriam Maney, MA, CPHQ; David C. Aron, MD, MS; Leonard M. Pogach, MD, MBA

Importance Although serious hypoglycemia is a common adverse drug event in ambulatory care, current performance measures do not assess potential overtreatment.

Objective To identify high-risk patients who had evidence of intensive glycemic management and thus were at risk for serious hypoglycemia.

Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional study of patients in the Veterans Health Administration receiving insulin and/or sulfonylureas in 2009.

Main Outcomes and Measures Intensive control was defined as the last hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measured in 2009 that was less than 6.0%, less than 6.5%, or less than 7.0%. The primary outcome measure was an HbA1c less than 7.0% in patients who were aged 75 years or older who had a serum creatinine value greater than 2.0 mg/dL or had a diagnosis of cognitive impairment or dementia. We also assessed the rates in patients with other significant medical, neurologic, or mental comorbid illness. Variation in rates of possible glycemic overtreatment was evaluated among 139 Veterans Health Administration facilities grouped within 21 Veteran Integrated Service Networks.

Results There were 652 378 patients who received insulin and/or a sulfonylurea with an HbA1c test result. Fifty percent received sulfonylurea therapy without insulin; the remainder received insulin therapy. We identified 205 857 patients (31.5%) as the denominator for the primary outcome measure; 11.3% had a last HbA1c value less than 6.0%, 28.6% less than 6.5%, and 50.0% less than 7.0%. Variation in rates by Veterans Integrated Service Network facility ranged 8.5% to 14.3%, 24.7% to 32.7%, and 46.2% to 53.4% for HbA1c less than 6.0%, less than 6.5%, and less than 7.0%, respectively. The magnitude of variation by facility was larger, with overtreatment rates ranging from 6.1% to 23.0%, 20.4% to 45.9%, and 39.7% to 65.0% for HbA1c less than 6.0%, less than 6.5%, and less than 7.0%, respectively. The maximum rate was nearly 4-fold compared with the minimum rates for HbA1c less than 6.0%, followed by 2.25-fold for HbA1c less than 6.5% and less than 2-fold for HbA1c less than 7.0%. When comorbid conditions were included, 430 178 patients (65.9%) were identified as high risk. Rates of overtreatment were 10.1% for HbA1c less than 6.0%, 25.2% for less than 6.5%, and 44.3% for less than 7.0%.

Conclusions and Relevance Patients with risk factors for serious hypoglycemia represent a large subset of individuals receiving hypoglycemic agents; approximately one-half had evidence of intensive treatment. A patient safety indicator derived from administrative data can identify high-risk patients for whom reevaluation of glycemic management may be appropriate, consistent with meaningful use criteria for electronic medical records.

JAMA Intern Med. 2014;174(2):259-268. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.12963.

Sign in

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal
• Rent this article ?

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Figures

Tables

References

CME
Also Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
Please click the checkbox indicating that you have read the full article in order to submit your answers.
Your answers have been saved for later.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

3,499 Views
3 Citations
×

Sign in

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal
• Rent this article ?

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Articles Related By Topic
Related Collections
PubMed Articles
Jobs
JAMAevidence.com

The Rational Clinical Examination: Evidence-Based Clinical Diagnosis
Diabetes, Foot Ulcer

The Rational Clinical Examination: Evidence-Based Clinical Diagnosis
Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

brightcove.createExperiences();