0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
From the JAMA Network |

Implications of the Pacific Ocular Inflammation Uveitis Epidemiology Study

Steven Yeh, MD1; Farzin Forooghian, MD, MSc2; Eric B. Suhler, MD, MPH3,4
[+] Author Affiliations
1Emory Eye Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia
2Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
3Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland
4Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland, Oregon
JAMA. 2014;311(18):1912-1913. doi:10.1001/jama.2014.2294.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

JAMA Ophthalmology

Incidence and Prevalence of Uveitis: Results From the Pacific Ocular Inflammation Study

Nisha R. Acharya, MD, MS; Vivien M. Tham, MD; Elizabeth Esterberg, MS; Durga S. Borkar, MD; John V. Parker, BS; Aleli C. Vinoya, BS; Aileen Uchida, MPH

Importance Uveitis is responsible for a significant proportion of legal blindness in the United States. Currently, there are few population-based reports characterizing the epidemiology of uveitis.

Objective To ascertain the incidence and prevalence of uveitis in a Hawaiian population and compare these estimates with those from prior population-based studies.

Design Retrospective, population-based cohort study conducted from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2007.

Setting Kaiser Permanente Hawaii, a multispecialty managed care organization serving approximately 15% of the general Hawaiian population with locations throughout the Hawaiian islands.

Participants All patients enrolled in the Kaiser Permanente Hawaii health plan during the study (N = 217 061).

Main Outcomes and Measures Clinical diagnosis of uveitis, either incident or prevalent, during the study determined by an initial search of the electronic medical record database of Kaiser Permanente Hawaii for uveitis-associated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis codes and subsequently confirmed through individual record review by a uveitis specialist.

Results Of 217 061 eligible patients, 872 were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes and 224 cases of uveitis were confirmed. The overall uveitis incidence rate was 24.9 cases per 100 000 person-years. The annual prevalence rates for 2006 and 2007 were 57.5 and 58.0 per 100 000 persons, respectively. No difference in incidence rate was found by sex (P = .63), but female patients had a higher prevalence (P = .008). Incidence and prevalence increased with older age (P < .001 for incidence and prevalence). Pacific Islanders had a lower prevalence rate than non–Pacific Islanders (2006: P = .09, 2007: P = .04), while white individuals had a higher prevalence rate than nonwhite individuals (2006: P = .07, 2007: P = .01).

Conclusions and Relevance The incidence and prevalence of uveitis in this population were much lower than in the Northern California Epidemiology of Uveitis Study, but similar to the Northwest Veterans Affairs Study. The results of this study highlight incidence and prevalence estimates in a new population and provide novel comparisons by race. These differences by race raise questions regarding the effects of genetic and environmental influences on the pathophysiology of uveitis.

JAMA Ophthalmol. 2013;131(11):1405-1412. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2013.4237.

Topics

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Figures

Tables

References

CME
Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Collections
Jobs
brightcove.createExperiences();