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From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention |

Announcement: Vision Health Initiative Website FREE

JAMA. 2010;303(3):226. doi:.
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Published online

MMWR. 2009;58:1209

CDC has created a new Vision Health Initiative website with information regarding vision and eye health, projects with diverse stakeholders, journal publications and reports, and vision health–related resources for professionals and consumers. The website includes an interactive map displaying state-specific vision and eye health statistics. With this tool, states that use the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System visual impairment and access to eye care module can produce reports and presentations with data specific to their states. The website can be accessed at http://www.cdc.gov/visionhealth.

In 2004, approximately 3.3 million persons aged ≥40 years had blindness or visual impairment; this number is predicted to double by 2030 because of increases in diabetes and other chronic diseases and aging of the U.S. population.1 With early detection and treatment, half of all blindness can be prevented or reversed.2

REFERENCES

Prevent Blindness America.  Vision problems in the U.S. 2008 update to the fourth edition. Available at http://www.preventblindness.org/vpus. Accessed October 29, 2009
Sommer A, Tielsch JM, Katz J,  et al.  Racial differences in the cause-specific prevalence of blindness in east Baltimore.  N Engl J Med. 1991;325(20):1412-1417
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References

Prevent Blindness America.  Vision problems in the U.S. 2008 update to the fourth edition. Available at http://www.preventblindness.org/vpus. Accessed October 29, 2009
Sommer A, Tielsch JM, Katz J,  et al.  Racial differences in the cause-specific prevalence of blindness in east Baltimore.  N Engl J Med. 1991;325(20):1412-1417
PubMed   |  Link to Article
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