0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention |

Availability of Work-Related Lung Disease Surveillance Report, 1999 FREE

JAMA. 2000;283(15):1955. doi:10.1001/jama.283.15.1955-JWR0419-3-1.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

MMWR. 2000;49:235

CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has released the Work-Related Lung Disease (WoRLD) Surveillance Report for 1999.1 This report is the fifth in a series of WoRLD reports presenting summary tables and figures concerning various occupationally relevant respiratory diseases, including pneumoconioses, occupational asthma, other airway diseases, and other respiratory conditions. The report has three major sections: (1) summary highlights and limitations; (2) disease-specific tables and figures; and (3) appendices describing data sources, methods, and supplementary information.

The WoRLD report presents national and state summary statistics such as counts, crude and age-adjusted mortality rates, and years of potential life lost to age 65 years and to life expectancy; U.S. maps showing the geographic distribution of mortality by state; and tables and figures summarizing selected occupational exposure data for asbestos, coal and coal mine dust, silica dust, cotton dust, and other substances. Proportionate mortality ratios by industry and occupation are based on the most recent decade of data from a subset of states for which usual industry and occupation have been coded for decedents. Also included are tables summarizing silicosis and asthma surveillance data collected by states funded by the Sentinel Event Notification Systems for Occupational Risks Program.

The 1999 WoRLD Surveillance Report is available from Surveillance Branch, Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, NIOSH, CDC, 1095 Willowdale Road, Morgantown, WV 26505-2888; fax (304) 285-6111; or e-mail WoRLD@cdc.gov.

REFERENCES

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Work-related lung disease surveillance report, 1999.  Cincinnati, Ohio US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, CDC, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health December1999;DHHS(NIOSH) publication no. 2000-105.

Figures

Tables

References

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Work-related lung disease surveillance report, 1999.  Cincinnati, Ohio US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, CDC, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health December1999;DHHS(NIOSH) publication no. 2000-105.

Letters

CME
Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Articles Related By Topic
Related Collections
PubMed Articles
Effects of propofol versus isoflurane on liver function after open thoracotomy. Asian Cardiovasc Thorac Ann Published online Sep 15, 2014.;
The English are healthier than the Americans: really? Int J Epidemiol Published online Sep 16, 2014.;
JAMAevidence.com

The Rational Clinical Examination EDUCATION GUIDES
Clubbing