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Editorial |

Thank You to JAMA Peer Reviewers, Authors, and Readers FREE

Phil B. Fontanarosa, MD, MBA1; Howard Bauchner, MD1
[+] Author Affiliations
1Dr Fontanarosa is Executive Editor and Dr Bauchner is Editor in Chief, JAMA
JAMA. 2014;311(7):681. doi:10.1001/jama.2014.598.
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In this issue of JAMA, we are pleased to publish the names of the 3960 peer reviewers of JAMA manuscripts in 2013.1 We extend our sincere thanks to these reviewers for their thoughtful, insightful, and scholarly evaluation of manuscripts. Even though the peer review process continues to undergo evaluation and evolution,2 we find the comments and suggestions from JAMA peer reviewers an indispensable aspect of the scientific publication process.

We also extend our sincere thanks to all authors who submitted manuscripts for consideration for publication in JAMA. In 2013, the 6937 total manuscripts and 4731 research papers submitted, as well as the 78 randomized clinical trials, 124 Editorials, and 192 Viewpoints published in JAMA, represent all-time highs (Table and eTable in the Supplement). We are honored to know that authors have the trust and confidence in JAMA to submit their most important papers for evaluation and possible publication, and the quality of these manuscripts is reflected in JAMA’s impact factor of 30. In addition, many authors have taken advantage of our new opportunity to designate at the time of submission that if their manuscript is not accepted by JAMA, it could immediately be considered for publication by one of the JAMA Network journals. In 2013, 1649 papers were transferred to the JAMA Network specialty journals.

In addition, we thank all who read, use, access, listen to, and learn from our content in any format and venue. We have continued to find ways to create new content and make useful information readily available, such as, during the past year, developing the JAMA Clinical Evidence Synopsis,3 adding a table to the Results section of select abstracts,4 providing content from The Medical Letter,5 and creating the JAMA Network Reader, which provides free access via smartphone, tablet, or desktop to content in all JAMA Network journals.6 In 2013, the reach of JAMA increased substantially, well beyond the 325 000 weekly recipients of the print journal, and now includes more than 400 000 subscribers to electronic alerts, more than 14 million website visits per year, more than 100 000 social media followers, an average of 16 million weekly viewers of the JAMA video news report, 15 000 podcast listeners each week, and 50 000 users of the JAMA Network Reader (Table).

We are honored to have the opportunity to serve the clinical, scientific, and academic community of reviewers and authors who contribute to JAMA and all who read our content. We appreciate your involvement in helping us fulfill our mission “to promote the science and art of medicine and the betterment of the public health.” We will continue to pursue and publish the best research articles and most useful clinical material possible, encourage enlightened discussion through Viewpoints and Editorials, and develop creative content and innovative ways to deliver information efficiently, effectively, and enjoyably.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Corresponding Author: Phil B. Fontanarosa, MD, MBA (phil.fontanarosa@jamanetwork.org).

Editorials represent the opinions of the authors and JAMA and not those of the American Medical Association.

 JAMA peer reviewers in 2013. JAMA. doi:10.1001/jama.2014.310.
The Seventh International Congress on Peer Review and Biomedical Publication. http://www.peerreviewcongress.org. Accessed January 26, 2014.
McDermott  MM, Livingston  EH.  Introducing JAMA Clinical Evidence Synopsis: from systematic reviews to clinical practice. JAMA. 2013;309(1):89.
Link to Article
Bauchner  H, Henry  R, Golub  RM.  The restructuring of structured abstracts: adding a table in the results section. JAMA. 2013;309(5):491-492.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Zuccotti  G, Livingston  EH.  The Medical Letter in JAMA. JAMA. 2014;311:144.
Link to Article
The JAMA Network Reader. http://mobile.jamanetwork.com. Accessed January 27, 2014.

Figures

Tables

References

 JAMA peer reviewers in 2013. JAMA. doi:10.1001/jama.2014.310.
The Seventh International Congress on Peer Review and Biomedical Publication. http://www.peerreviewcongress.org. Accessed January 26, 2014.
McDermott  MM, Livingston  EH.  Introducing JAMA Clinical Evidence Synopsis: from systematic reviews to clinical practice. JAMA. 2013;309(1):89.
Link to Article
Bauchner  H, Henry  R, Golub  RM.  The restructuring of structured abstracts: adding a table in the results section. JAMA. 2013;309(5):491-492.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Zuccotti  G, Livingston  EH.  The Medical Letter in JAMA. JAMA. 2014;311:144.
Link to Article
The JAMA Network Reader. http://mobile.jamanetwork.com. Accessed January 27, 2014.

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eTable. JAMA Peer Reviewers, Manuscript Data, and Impact Factor, 2007-2013

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