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This Week in JAMA |

This Week in JAMA FREE

JAMA. 2008;299(7):727. doi:10.1001/jama.299.7.727.
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T3LEVELS IN ATHYREOTIC PATIENTS TAKING LEVOTHYROXINE

ANNUAL VS BIANNUAL ANTIBIOTICS TO ELIMINATE TRACHOMA

AFTER-HOURS IN-HOSPITAL CARDIAC ARREST SURVIVAL

Peberdy and colleagues analyzed national registry data to assess whether patient survival following in-hospital cardiac arrest differs during nights and weekends compared with day/evenings and weekdays. In analyses that controlled for patient, event, and hospital characteristics, the authors found that rates of survival to discharge were lower for cardiac arrests occurring during the night compared with those occurring during the day/evening. Among cardiac arrests occurring during day/evening hours, patient survival was higher on weekdays than weekends. Among cardiac arrests occurring during the night, survival was similar on weekdays and on weekends.

DIALYSIS IN ACUTE RENAL FAILURE

In a systematic review of randomized clinical trials and prospective cohort investigations studying dialysis for patients with acute renal failure, Pannu and colleagues critically evaluate the current evidence guiding provision of dialysis. The authors summarize what is known about patient mortality, length of stay, chronic dialysis dependence, blood pressure and hypotension, and bleeding complications in relation to indications and timing of dialysis; and dialysis modalities, dialysis dose, anticoagulation, dialysis membranes, and dialysate composition. The authors identify areas for future research and conclude with recommendations for treating patients with severe acute renal failure.

CLINICIAN'S CORNER
LOWER LIMB OSTEOMYELITIS IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES
THE RATIONAL CLINICAL EXAMINATION

The accuracy of the patient history, physical examination findings, and laboratory and imaging results in the diagnosis of lower limb osteomyelitis in patients with diabetes.

A PIECE OF MY MIND

“[D]eath is death, no matter when or where it occurs, no matter the victim or victims, no matter human or animal—it hurts.” From “Sammy.”

MEDICAL NEWS & PERSPECTIVES

Physicians have been slow to adopt brief, inexpensive, and effective interventions to help patients with excessive alcohol use. But experts believe recent developments might lead to wider implementation.

COMMENTARY

Addressing racial inequities in health care.

APPRECIATION

Appreciation for JAMA’s peer reviewers and authors.

AUTHOR IN THE ROOM TELECONFERENCE

Join Stephen Shortell, PhD, on March 19, 2008, from 2 to 3 PM eastern time to discuss improving patient safety. To register, go to http://www.ihi.org/AuthorintheRoom.

AUDIO COMMENTARY

Dr DeAngelis summarizes and comments on this week's issue. Go to http://jama.ama-assn.org/misc/audiocommentary.dtl

READERS RESPOND

How would you manage a 74-year-old man who has moderate daily alcohol use, memory loss, and progressive neuropathy? Go to www.jama.com to read the case and submit your response. Your response may be selected for online publication. Submission deadline is February 27.

JAMA PATIENT PAGE

For your patients: Information about osteomyelitis.

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The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
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