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Editorial |

JAMA Theme Issue on Diabetes—Call for Papers FREE

Anne R. Cappola, MD, ScM1,2; Edward Livingston, MD3
[+] Author Affiliations
1Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
2Associate Editor, JAMA
3Deputy Editor, JAMA
JAMA. 2013;310(20):2153. doi:10.1001/jama.2013.282484.
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Published online

To coincide with the American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions in June 2014, JAMA will publish a theme issue on diabetes research. Our goals are to inform readers about the latest research in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and to provide useful reviews of the current state of basic and clinical science underlying diabetes treatments. The World Health Organization estimates that 350 million people worldwide have diabetes.1 The international obesity epidemic has certainly accelerated the need to better understand the epidemiology, identification, and treatment of diabetes.

We invite manuscripts that address the identification and management of this complex chronic disease. We are especially interested in clinical trials of prevention, treatment, and delivery of care for people with diabetes. Care requirements and treatment goals for diabetes vary by age, and we welcome studies of patient populations of any and all ages, from children to the elderly. We recognize that diabetes is a global health problem, and we encourage submission of manuscripts that address aspects of diabetes that may be unique to a specific regional population, such as Asia or Africa. For example, a recent study indicated that approximately 114 million individuals in China have type 2 diabetes and an additional 493 million have prediabetes.2 A recent meta-analysis estimated a 5.7% prevalence rate of diabetes associated with impaired glucose tolerance among adults in sub-Saharan Africa.3 Both of these studies highlight the burden of noncommunicable diseases, especially diabetes, which is among the most common, with more than 80% of the 3.4 million annual deaths from diabetes occurring in low- and middle-income countries.4

We encourage authors to submit reports of original research, review articles, and Viewpoints for consideration for this theme issue. We are particularly interested in reports of randomized clinical trials that represent advances in the treatment of diabetes and interventions aimed at prevention. Authors who are interested in submitting a manuscript for the diabetes theme issue should indicate this in the cover letter accompanying their manuscript submission. Manuscripts received before January 15, 2014, will have the best chance of consideration for the theme issue. Exceptions may be granted for late-breaking randomized clinical trials to be presented at the American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions. In these cases, we recommend that authors contact us as early as possible to discuss the trial and to allow coordination of timing of publication with the scientific presentation. We also welcome questions about this theme issue. Authors should consult the JAMA Instructions for Authors for guidelines on manuscript preparation and submission.5 High-quality manuscripts submitted to JAMA that are not of sufficiently high priority for publication in JAMA may be referred to another journal in The JAMA Network.

We look forward to receiving your manuscripts for the 2014 diabetes theme issue of JAMA.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Corresponding Author: Anne R. Cappola, MD, ScM, Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd, 12th Floor, TRC Room 136, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (acappola@mail.med.upenn.edu).

Published Online: October 30, 2013. doi:10.1001/jama.2013.282484.

Editorials represent the opinions of the authors and JAMA and not those of the American Medical Association.

World Health Organization. Diabetes. Fact sheet 312. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs312/en/index.html. Updated October 2013. Accessed October 22, 2013.
Xu  Y, Wang  L, He  J,  et al; 2010 China Noncommunicable Disease Surveillance Group.  Prevalence and control of diabetes in Chinese adults. JAMA. 2013;310(9):948-959.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Hilawe  EH, Yatsuya  H, Kawaguchi  L, Aoyama  A.  Differences by sex in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glycaemia and impaired glucose tolerance in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Bull World Health Organ. 2013;91(9):671-682D.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Mathers  CD, Loncar  D.  Projections of global mortality and burden of disease from 2002 to 2030. PLoS Med. 2006;3(11):e442.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
JAMA Instructions for Authors. http://jama.jamanetwork.com/public/instructionsForAuthors.aspx. Accessed October 21, 2013.

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References

World Health Organization. Diabetes. Fact sheet 312. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs312/en/index.html. Updated October 2013. Accessed October 22, 2013.
Xu  Y, Wang  L, He  J,  et al; 2010 China Noncommunicable Disease Surveillance Group.  Prevalence and control of diabetes in Chinese adults. JAMA. 2013;310(9):948-959.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Hilawe  EH, Yatsuya  H, Kawaguchi  L, Aoyama  A.  Differences by sex in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glycaemia and impaired glucose tolerance in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Bull World Health Organ. 2013;91(9):671-682D.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Mathers  CD, Loncar  D.  Projections of global mortality and burden of disease from 2002 to 2030. PLoS Med. 2006;3(11):e442.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
JAMA Instructions for Authors. http://jama.jamanetwork.com/public/instructionsForAuthors.aspx. Accessed October 21, 2013.

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