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The Cover |

Coronary Artery Occlusion

Howard Bauchner, MD
JAMA. 2011;306(19):2064. doi:10.1001/jama.2011.1628.
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Extract

The covers of JAMA represent a wonderful tradition—fine art with an accompanying descriptive narrative. The “art of JAMA ” debuted nearly 50 years ago, and over the past two decades fine art has become the primary image on the cover. During the interview process and after I was named editor in chief, I was often asked and received a great deal of unsolicited advice about the covers. For me the question has always remained the same—how do you embrace a great tradition, but ensure that it evolves to meet contemporary needs?

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Alison E. Burke, MA, CMI, and Cassio Lynm, MA, CMI. Coronary Artery Occlusion, 2011. A total occlusion in a diagonal branch of the left anterior descending artery—the beginnings of a localized myocardial infarction. This week’s cover highlights a pivotal moment in a cardiovascular event involving a branch of the left coronary artery. See magnification of the cover image.

The early development of the cover image was an exploration of the theme of cardiovascular disease, with proposed ideas that highlighted different content, using shifts in perspective and magnification to create dramatic landscapes or interesting visual challenges. Eventually, the focus became specific to atherosclerosis primarily because of its prevalence and clinical importance. Above are 3 of the runner-up concepts. Left, Cellular view of early atherosclerotic plaque formation. Middle, A busy network of small vessels coursing through cerebral tissue, one of which is experiencing a thrombotic event. Right, Similar concept to the final illustration, but at a different scale—a peek at thrombosis in a translucent coronary artery.

Place holder to copy figure label and caption

Graphic Jump LocationImage not available.

Alison E. Burke, MA, CMI, and Cassio Lynm, MA, CMI. Coronary Artery Occlusion, 2011. A total occlusion in a diagonal branch of the left anterior descending artery—the beginnings of a localized myocardial infarction. This week’s cover highlights a pivotal moment in a cardiovascular event involving a branch of the left coronary artery. See magnification of the cover image.

The early development of the cover image was an exploration of the theme of cardiovascular disease, with proposed ideas that highlighted different content, using shifts in perspective and magnification to create dramatic landscapes or interesting visual challenges. Eventually, the focus became specific to atherosclerosis primarily because of its prevalence and clinical importance. Above are 3 of the runner-up concepts. Left, Cellular view of early atherosclerotic plaque formation. Middle, A busy network of small vessels coursing through cerebral tissue, one of which is experiencing a thrombotic event. Right, Similar concept to the final illustration, but at a different scale—a peek at thrombosis in a translucent coronary artery.

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The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
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